work for hire

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work for hire

n.
1. pl. works for hire A composition or creation whose copyright is owned or retained by the party that commissioned it or by the employer of the person who produced it.
2. pl. work for hires A legal contract that commissions a work for hire.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He wrote that "all articles you have written for The New Republic have been 'works made for hire,' as that term is defined under the U.S.
An exception is "works made for hire." (6) Photographs taken as a direct part of clinical work by the pathologist may fall into this category depending on the terms of employment contracts and institutional policies, and the copyright may be retained by the employer.
If your employees regularly engage in freelancing and side projects, it would be wise to require new hires to sign an agreement stating that all materials, ideas and work product developed using company resources are works made for hire and are the sole property of the company.
Industry: Sound Recordings Should Constitute Works Made for Hire, 67 U.
VARA does not apply to works made for hire; posters; maps; technical drawings; diagrams; models; applied art; motion pictures; or books and other publications and art produced primarily for commercial purposes, such as advertising, packaging or promotional materials.
While the concepts of "shop rights" and "works made for hire" do exist in some circumstances, they most likely will only apply to employees and not contractors.
BBC News reported that Judge Denise Cote described the albums as 'works made for hire'.
On Friday, however, Judge Cote ruled that Marley's recordings were "works made for hire" as defined under US copyright law.
"This is as clear as can be that these are works made for hire."
One of the most pressing issues facing record labels today is whether sound recordings constitute works made for hire under the United States copyright law.