Workways

Work´ways`


adv.1.In a working position or manner; as, a T rail placed workwise, i.e., resting on its base.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
I immediately recognized him as someone who truly understood the workways of parliament.
"Think about Dean from Briton Ferry who found a route back in to work with help from the EU-funded Workways project.
(235) See, e.g., Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Workways of the Supreme Court, 25 T.
They helped her get dry and now, after 15 years unemployed, Jackie is starting her first job with help from Workways, an EU-funded local council project to help long-term jobless back to work.
Katzmann, supra note 53, at 670 ("It is a bipartisan institutional perspective within Congress that courts should consider reliable legislative history and that failing to do so impugns Congress's workways.").
(83) Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Thomas Jefferson Lecture: Workways of the Supreme Court (Feb.
Katzmann, Steps Towards Optimal Judicial Workways: Perspectives from the Federal Bench, 59 N.Y.U.
'I usually manage 20 or so goals a season, but things are going really well so far this season,' says Jones, whose job outside football is with Workways.
Workways of Governance: Monitoring Our Government's Health.
Through the telling of her oral history, we can understand the work culture and the way she and her staff developed "systems" or workways and utilized mapping techniques to navigate the complexities of library work taking place both within the library and in the field.
In each instance they observe a functioning pragmatism that permits enough private initiative to stimulate the investment of capital and labor, enough deviation from the norms of traditional society to honor nonconformity in workways and expression.
If traveling the workways of cooperative education appeals to you, find out more from the nearest career counselor.