Wouk


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Wouk

 (wōk), Herman Born 1915.
American writer whose novels include The Caine Mutiny (1951), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize, and The Winds of War (1971).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Wouk

(woʊk)

n.
Herman, born 1915, U.S. novelist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Wouk - United States writer (born in 1915)Wouk - United States writer (born in 1915)
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References in periodicals archive ?
He had in mind such books as John Dos Passos's Nineteen Nineteen, Herman Wouk's The Winds of War, and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's August 1914.
I am taken back to the raw, inspiring, spellbinding, reverential, heartbreaking description of the battle in Herman Wouk's "War and Remembrance." If you've read the account, you did not forget it.
The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Jerusalem Post as well as wire services and other newspapers all managed to leave Zionism out of their summations of Wouk's life.
Herman Wouk had a career which spanned more than six decades and, as well as books, he also penned plays and screenplays.
PULITZER Prize winner Herman Wouk has died at the age of 103.
Herman Wouk, the centenarian author of bestselling novels including0x20The Caine Mutiny,0x20The Winds of War, and0x20Marjorie Morningstar, has died at age 103.
In chapter 4, Garrett reads the novels of Herman Wouk and Leon Uris as (a) rebuttals to Mailer, and (b) exemplars of an emerging conservatism.
I started with war books: Herman Wouk (The Winds of War, War and Remembrance) and The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan, an exhaustive telling of the gliderborne soldiers who preceded the assault on Normandy.
No surprise, then, that many American literary greats of the postwar decade--James Michener, Herman Wouk, Norman Mailer, and others--had served in or reported on the Second World War.
Where earlier generations of Netherlandish artists had traveled to Italy only to fail to comprehend its art fully, or conversely to imitate Italian style at the expense of their northern identity, says Wouk, Floris moved freely between traditions.
It's an old-fashioned page-turner, tweaked by this witty and sophisticated writer so that you sometimes feel she has retrofitted sleek new engines inside a craft owned for too long by James Jones and Herman Wouk.