false imprisonment

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Related to Wrongful incarceration: Wrongful conviction

false imprisonment

n.
1. Physical confinement of a person or interference with a person's liberty in violation of criminal or constitutional law.
2. The tort of unlawful confinement of a person.

false imprisonment

n
(Law) law the restraint of a person's liberty without lawful authority

false′ impris′onment


n.
the unlawful restraint of a person from exercising the right to freedom of movement.
[1760–70]

false imprisonment

The illegal or unjustified detention of a person.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.false imprisonment - (law) confinement without legal authority
internment, imprisonment - the act of confining someone in a prison (or as if in a prison)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
References in periodicals archive ?
Dismantled like the rest After a last ditch effort by religious zealots to steal Aasia Bibi's hard-fought freedom the Supreme Court upheld its acquittal decision and she can now finally get on with her life after eight long years of wrongful incarceration. With it comes the virtual elimination of the far right religious extremist Khadim Rizvi and his party the TLP that apart from establishing itself as the so-called protector of Islam' had made inroads into politics in last year's general elections as well.
The administration wasted some $5 million on an unusable software package for the court clerk's office and has spent untold millions on litigation for wrongful incarceration and jail abuses.
Cheng filed an application for compensation for the 4,322 days he spent in wrongful incarceration, asking for NT$5,000 (US$162) per day, which amounted to more than NT$21 million (US$678,000).
(87) The work went beyond addressing the aftermath facing those exonerated to address the effects of wrongful incarceration on others: family members and loved ones of the exoneree; family members and loved ones of the crime survivor/victim; individuals involved with the case as investigators, judicial officials or jurors, or defense team members; and those in the community who are affected by the many barriers to successful reintegration when exonerees return home.
Where the Foreign Office's feeble assertions that the government had been making efforts for his repatriation are lip-service that gloss over their callous negligence of this issue, the disturbing fact remains that Zulfiqar suffered wrongful incarceration for 14 years, a circumstance our Ministry of Foreign Services was well aware of, along with the fact that he was wrongfully convicted.
Volvo has fired other employees for violating this rule.<br />Felts nevertheless contends that his medical condition was implicated because his absence was at least partially caused by a severe panic attack "as a result of his wrongful incarceration." But Volvo has proffered overwhelming evidence that it chose not to award back pay because of the rule violation, about which there are no material factual disputes, and Felts has pointed to no evidence whatsoever that would suggest pretext as to this decision.<br />Finally, Felts cannot show that Volvo retaliated against him after rehire.
One of the challenges in writing this book, even though it's about wrongful incarceration, is to remember, people have a full life.
The family of a man freed after 30 years of wrongful incarceration reached a $13.25 million settlement with the city of St.
According to officials of Legal Aid Society-an American institution which provides legal help to the people who can't afford it-47 clients had to be saved from wrongful incarceration. These 47 clients overstayed their release dates over a massive 4677 days.
Arthenia Joyner mingled with her former colleagues on the Senate floor to finally witness the unanimous passage of one of her pet projects: changing the "clean hands" provision in the 2008 Victims of Wrongful Incarceration Act.
(9) Such statutes largely ignore the nature, severity, and variation of injuries suffered while incarcerated; fail to account for post-release damages, such as ongoing psychological and medical harms; and overlook the pressing needs many exonerees have for social, vocational, medical, and educational services following what is often years of wrongful incarceration. In sum, most of these statutes reflect a begrudging rather than a restorative approach to remedying the harm done to the wrongly convicted.