wu wei


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wu wei

 (wo͞o wā)
n.
A Taoist principle of action in accordance with the true nature of people, objects, and systems, rather than striving for dominance and control.

[Mandarin wúwéi : Mandarin , not to have, there is no (thing) (from Middle Chinese ʋjyə̆, ʋuə̆) + Mandarin wéi, to do, make, become, be (from Middle Chinese yj).]
References in periodicals archive ?
Certainly Tianjin Tinhai's Wu Wei and Victoria Guimaraes' stopper Li Yang looked like they had never played together at centre-back and needed the runout.
The Sheng is actually a sonorous mouthorgan, vertically held, its keys grouped all the way around its circumference, and it is capable of the widest range of nuances, from the mightiest weight of a pedal-organ to the most delicate of whispers, and Wu Wei brought all his skills and natural musicality to these two performances featuring this wonderful instrument.
"Feng shui teaches that your environment can impact mood too," says Alexandra Lees, founder of Wu Wei Wisdom (wuweiwisdom.com).
"Feng shui teaches that your environment can impact mood, too," says Alexandra Lees, founder of Wu Wei Wisdom (wuweiwisdom.com).
The Chinese secured the top three places in the boys division, with Wu Wei leading the way with 101.685 points, edging out teammates Kang Ning (100.605) and Fu Fantao (100.585), who were second and third, respectively.
But I never thought the constitution would be revised so quickly," said Wu Wei, a former official who advised Zhao Ziyang, the party leader ousted during the mass protests of 1989 in Tiananmen Square.
"Shallow breathing saps your energy levels and destabilises your emotional balance," says David James Lees, a Taoist monk and co-founder of Wu Wei Wisdom.
The Ninth International Pharos Contemporary Music Festival will start on Friday with the concert Exploring the Sounds of the Far East with Wu Wei (on Sheng) and Naomi Sato (on Sho) at 8.30pm in Nicosia.
Central to Taoism is the concept of wu wei, which can be literally translated as "non-action," but is really much more than that.
All of the major tenets of Zhuangzi's philosophy are featured, including: Taoist concepts of emptiness, stillness, Wu Wei (i.e.
(45) Laozi, Dao de-Jing, [section]'s 6, 10, 61; See also Edward Slingerland, Effortless Action: Wu Wei and Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Idea in Early China, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), 83.