wu wei

(redirected from Wu-wei)
Related to Wu-wei: Daoist

wu wei

 (wo͞o wā)
n.
A Taoist principle of action in accordance with the true nature of people, objects, and systems, rather than striving for dominance and control.

[Mandarin wúwéi : Mandarin , not to have, there is no (thing) (from Middle Chinese ʋjyə̆, ʋuə̆) + Mandarin wéi, to do, make, become, be (from Middle Chinese yj).]
References in periodicals archive ?
Shailly Lal's paintings are inspired by nature and based on 'Wu-Wei' the Chinese philosophical concept that nature creates calmness in human minds, whereas Hanan Nagi has used resin pigment and acrylic on canvas to convey the beauty of the desert landscape of the UAE.
Fourth, it is shown how the Daoist plant-model supports a novel account of the central Daoist notion of wu-wei (doing nothing, but everything gets done).
(7) The parallels are striking, most notably the parallel between the Taoist concept of wu-wei and the Austrian concept of spontaneous order.
Old roots diversify in new, unexplored directions, based on such ancient concepts as the Japanese wabi-sabi (the aesthetics of imperfection and natural wisdom) and mono-no-aware (the awareness of impermanence), the Portuguese saudade (nostalgia, melancholy), the Chinese wu-wei (action through non-doing), and the Indian pranasya prana (life-giving force) or buddhi (intuition).
Ancient Chinese philosophers would refer to this experience of flow as Wu-Wei, which is translated literally into "no action." Wu-Wei, however, goes beyond simple inaction, it refers to the transformation of a person into a conduit following a total integration of body and mind through "effortless or spontaneous action." It is a state of being where one is active and in total sync yet unconscious.
Slingerland, professor of Asian studies at the University of British Columbia, explores early Chinese philosophers' wu-wei approach of bringing body, mind and emotions into harmony.
Effortless action: Wu-wei as conceptual metaphor and spiritual ideal in early China.
In the concluding chapter of this thoughtful work, Steinkerchner turns to the virtue of wu-wei in the Tao Te Ching to interpret the characters and conflicts of the Johannine Passion Narrative.
Then he moves onto well known concepts such as wu-wei (take-no-action) and de (virtue), terms that appear in other Chinese philosophies and resonate with thinkers throughout Korean and Japanese history as well.
In case this sounds like the Daoist model for leadership, wu-wei, " masterful inactivity", I hasten to add that probably no WHA President has spent more time on detail work and worry than I did.