wudu

(redirected from Wudhu)

wudu

(wudu)
n
1. (Islam) the practice of ritual washing before daily prayer
2. (Islam) a room designated for ritual washing before daily prayer
[from Arabic]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Built just along the mosque entrance, the facility will play a crucial part for the 'wudhu' (washing) rite among Maranaos before they enter the mosque to pray.
Authorities said 12,435 new taps have replaced the ablution water taps in the mosques in order to reduce water usage during the pre-prayer ablution process, known as wudhu.
Actress Sabrina Ali has launched her perfume called Sphere Perfume Sweet and Exclusive Sabrina, which is specially formulated for women and wudhu (pre-prayer ablution) friendly.
hardware/software solution that addresses water wastage during Wudhu at the
An Nahr is an interactive hardware/software solution that addresses the issue of water wastage during the Wudhu (ablution) at the mosques.
Take a deep breath and make ablution (wudhu) * What is your source of strength during tough times?
This may give another problem to the women user to take their wudhu'.
Miqat - putting on 'Ihram at designated places with wudhu (ablution).
I also collect the water that I use for wudhu (washing ritual) before prayer five times a day.
The school was established in 1988, and contains 130 rooms, including a science laboratory, prayer hall and facilities for wudhu, or Islamic ablution.
A proposal by five Abu Dhabi higher education students to separate and repurpose the water used in the process of Wudhu - the washing of the arms and face in the mosque before prayer - won first place, and funding of up to $5,000 (AED 18,350) for implementation, at the conclusion of the inaugural Sila Abu Dhabi conference.
Islam dictates that (1) the touch of non-muhrim member of the opposite sex invalidates wudhu (ritual purity)--the thinking being that since relations with muhrim would be incestuous, there is no need to safeguard against sexual desire and the impurity it brings--and (2) that women should wear hijab in front of men who are not muhrim, both of which complicate matters of who, exactly, a woman can and cannot be in contact with.