x-ray astronomy

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Related to X-Ray Telescope: ultraviolet telescope

x-ray astronomy

n.
The branch of astronomy that uses observations of emissions in the x-ray part of electromagnetic spectrum to study extraterrestrial sources such as stars, galaxies, and interstellar gas clouds.

X-ray astronomy

n
(Astronomy) the branch of astronomy concerned with the detection and measurement of X-rays emitted by certain celestial bodies. As X-rays are absorbed by the atmosphere, satellites and rockets are used

x-ray astronomy

The branch of astronomy dealing with the detection of objects in space by means of the x-rays they emit.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hitomi sports four X-ray telescopes, two for "soft" (low-energy) photons and two for "hard" (high-energy) ones.
The X-ray telescope on Swift has played a key role in these discoveries, but as well as finding the afterglows of Gamma-ray burst (GRB) it also sees many other unrelated X-ray sources that are serendipitously in the telescope's field of view.
The gas behind the shock wave is visible only with an x-ray telescope, and has a temperature of about 10 million degrees.
Try NASA's new Chandra (KAHN-drah) X-ray telescope. In July 1999, space shuttle Columbia launched the 14-meter (45-foot) long telescope into Earth's orbit.
Today, when a short burst of gamma rays that has been traveling through space for millions or even billions of years approaches Earth, it is first detected by a gamma ray observatory in orbit, then located more precisely by an orbiting X-ray telescope. Soon thereafter, observatories from many parts of the world and orbital space, tuned to diverse frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum, focus their sights on the same tiny pinpoint of the cosmos, thanks to global E-mail delivery of the gamma burst's location.
Collins is supervising a mission to put the Chandra X-ray telescope into an orbit extending a third of the way to the moon.
Columbia's mission is the long- delayed release into orbit of a pounds 1billion X-ray telescope which will spend five years observing deep space.
It was a huge disappointment for Collins and her crew, as well as for the numerous female notables including First Lady Mrs Hillary Clinton and daughter Chelsea gathered for the early-morning launch of not only the first woman to lead a US space mission but the world's most powerful X-ray telescope.
For the first time, the x-ray telescope will be able to measure chemical compositions - providing vital clues about how galaxies are formed.
Performing beyond expectations, the high-resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope successfully have completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility in Huntsville, Ala.