X-chromosome


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Related to X-chromosome: Y-chromosome

X chromosome

or X-chro·mo·some (ĕks′krō′mə-sōm′)
n.
The sex chromosome associated with female characteristics in mammals, occurring paired in the female and single in the male.

X-chromosome

n
(Biology) the sex chromosome that occurs in pairs in the diploid cells of the females of many animals, including humans, and as one of a pair with the Y-chromosome in those of males. Compare Y-chromosome

X-chro·mo·some

(ĕks′krō′mə-sōm′)
The sex chromosome that in females is paired with another X-chromosome and in males is paired with a Y-chromosome.
Translations

X-chromosome

nX-Chromosom nt

X-chromosome

[ˈɛksˈkrəʊməsəʊm] ncromosoma m X
References in periodicals archive ?
Long noncoding RNA X-chromosome inactive specific transcript
In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sex determination is a direct function of X-chromosome dosage, with XX being hermaphrodites if the ratio of X-chromosomes to autosomes (A) is balanced (2X/2A = 1), and X0 being male (Hodgkin 2002).
When breed-specific X-chromosome regional gene expression differences were determined, the chromosomal band Xq13, which contains 13 genes including OGT and X inactivation-specific transcript (XIST), ranked highest by criteria of placental gene expression and chromosomal location [19].
Sex chromatin seen as darkly staining mass at the nucleus of all non-dividing cells of genotypically females represents the heterochromatin of the inactivated X-chromosome.
Although X monosomy is the most frequent chromosomal finding, in some patients with the Turner syndrome the karyotype shows variants of X-chromosome abnormalities such as deletions, duplications, inversions, X/autosomal balanced translocations, and rings.
The selection of which X-chromosome (derived from the mother or the father) is inactivated appears to be random but that selection is maintained through subsequent cell divisions.
revealed myelolipomas and displayed X-chromosome inactivation in both fat and haematopoietic elements, which suggests clonal origin of myelolipoma.
The best example is Rett syndrome which was diagnosed as a pervasive developmental disorder in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) [4] but re-classified as a neurological disorder in the more recent fifth edition of the diagnostic manual (DSM-5) [5] because research found it was caused by a single X-chromosome mutation in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MEC([p.
A striking example of such developmentally regulated gene control is X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), whereby one of the two X chromosomes in females is silenced during embryogenesis.
Several causes such as skewed X-chromosome inactivation, genomic imprinting, single gene mutations, chromosomal instability and sperm chromosomal abnormalities have been suggested to explain the reproductive losses (13).