x-ray burster

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x-ray burster

n.
Any of several celestial phenomena characterized by the occasional and sometimes periodic emission of short, very powerful bursts of x-radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
(https://www.aanda.org/component/article?access=doi&doi=10.1051/0004-6361/201731082) The study , titled "Neutron star mass and radius measurements from atmospheric model fits X-ray burst cooling tail spectra," appeared online in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
In early 2013, they picked up an X-ray burst that they soon determined came from a magnetar, a supremely exotic cosmic object.
Using the Gemini North telescope on the Hawaiian mountain Mauna Kea, the researchers then took another look at the same spot in the sky as where the X-ray burst had been.
To create an X-ray burst, they split away a fraction of the energy of each pulse and use it to intensely heat a copper wire.
The rings are light echoes from Circinus X-1's X-ray burst. Each of the four rings, says Heinz, indicates a dense cloud of dust between us and the supernova remnant.
On April 21, 2012, just a week before Swift observed the anti-glitch, 1E 2259+586 produced a brief, but intense X-ray burst detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.
Data from the X-ray satellite ROSAT, which detected an X-ray burst in Jupiter's northern midlatitudes minutes after the K impact, may shed light on the auroras.
While some flares do indeed exhibit an extended cascade of soft X-rays on the heels of the intense, hard X-ray burst, X-ray component.
Another, more subtle, way that recycled pulsars reveal their fast spin rates is during an X-ray burst, a magnificent flare that low-mass X-ray binaries sometimes emit.
In this model, the energy required to drive the thermonuclear explosion necessary to produce an X-ray burst would come from a special sequence of nuclear fusion reactions in which nuclei capture protons to create new isotopes.
If an accretion disk partially blocks the view, the intensity of any detected X-ray burst represents only a fraction of its true intensity.