dom

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Dom

 (dŏm)
n.
1. (also dōN) Used formerly as a title for male members of Portuguese and Brazilian royalty, aristocracy, and hierarchy, preceding the given name.
2. Roman Catholic Church Used as a title before the names of Benedictine and Carthusian monks in major or minor orders.

[Portuguese, from Latin dominus, lord, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dom

(dɒm)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) (sometimes capital) RC Church a title given to Benedictine, Carthusian, and Cistercian monks and to certain of the canons regular
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly in Portugal and Brazil) a title borne by royalty, princes of the Church, and nobles
[C18 (monastic title): from Latin dominus lord]

DOM

abbreviation for
1. (Architecture) Deo Optimo Maximo
2. informal Dirty Old Man
abbreviation for
(Automotive Engineering) Dominican Republic (international car registration)
[(for sense 1) Latin: to God, the best, the Greatest]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dom

(dɒm; for 2 also Port. dɔ̃)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) a title of a monk in certain monastic orders.
2. (usu. cap.) a Portuguese title affixed to a man's given name; Sir: formerly a title of certain dignitaries.
[1710–20; short for Latin dominus lord, master]

-dom

a suffix forming nouns that refer to domain (kingdom), collection of persons (officialdom), rank or station (earldom), or general condition (freedom).
[Middle English; Old English -dōm; c. Old Norse -dōmr, German -tum; see doom]

Dom.

1. Dominica.
2. Dominican.

dom.

1. domain.
2. domestic.
3. dominant.
4. dominion.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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