Xanthippe


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Xan·thip·pe

 (zăn-thĭp′ē, -tĭp′ē) or Xan·tip·pe (-tĭp′ē) Fifth century bc.
The wife of Socrates, traditionally described as shrewish and scolding.

Xanthippe

(zænˈθɪpɪ) or

Xantippe

n
1. (Biography) the wife of Socrates, proverbial as a scolding and quarrelsome woman
2. any nagging, peevish, or irritable woman

Xan•thip•pe

(zænˈtɪp i)

n.
1. fl. late 5th century B.C., wife of Socrates.
2. a shrewish woman.
References in classic literature ?
"By this Xanthippe" (so was the wife of Socrates called, said Partridge)--"by this Xanthippe he had two sons, of which I was the younger.
Visibility is more important than ever nowadays, especially for communities often ignored in the media, which is why comic artist Xanthippe Hutcheon (best known as "Xan") took a stab at drawing some of the more than 30 flags representing groups on the LGBTQ+ spectrum.
That marriage is a threat to an ascetic life goes back to Socrates having to face the complaints and sometimes assaults of his wife Xanthippe, a conflict which is also noted with some emphasis in Jerome's Against Jovinian.
Er muss auf jeden Fall einem Jungen wie Theatet oder Platon helfen, eine Frau wie Xanthippe gut behandeln, einen Sohn wie Lamprokles gut erziehen, fur eine Stadt wie Athen im Krieg kampfen usw.
Kimmy is also battling her demons - and Lillian's bratty teenage stepdaughter Xanthippe who's veering completely off the rails and dabbling in drugs, drink and anything else she can get her hands on.
DAMJANIC Xanthippe (Xanthi) (nee Livieratou) Memory Eternal Passed away peacefully at Coventry University Hospital on Thursday 9th July, aged 82 years.
Xanthippe Voorhees, Jacqueline's stepdaughter, is an unhappy teenager who tries to impress her friends by pretending at promiscuity, drinking, and drug use.
Misogynist diatribes of this ilk conventionally cite Mary as the exception to the rule--as the opposite of Xanthippe, Clytemnestra, Jezebel, and Eve.
Or, with regard to the Middle Ages, Christina Neufeld shows in Xanthippe's Sisters: Orality and Femininity in the Later Middle Ages how in satirical depictions women were perceived as deviant speakers of loquacious gossip, as scolding shrews, and as cursing witches.
Socrates defining wisdom in the marketplace not Xanthippe at home pounding out the phyllo for the baklava.