Xhosa

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Xho·sa

also Xo·sa  (kō′sä, -zə)
n. pl. Xhosa or Xho·sas also Xosa or Xo·sas
1. A member of a Bantu people inhabiting the eastern part of Cape Province, South Africa.
2. The Nguni language of this people, closely related to Zulu.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Xhosa

(ˈkɔːsə)
npl -sa or -sas
1. (Peoples) a member of a cattle-rearing Negroid people of southern Africa, living chiefly in South Africa
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Bantu group of the Niger-Congo family: one of the Nguni languages, closely related to Swazi and Zulu and characterized by several clicks in its sound system
ˈXhosan adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Xho•sa

(ˈkoʊ sə, -zə, ˈkɔ-)

n., pl. -sas, (esp. collectively) -sa.
1. a member of a Nguni people of E Cape Province, South Africa.
2. the Bantu language of the Xhosa.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Xhosa - a member of the Negroid people of southern South Africa
Republic of South Africa, South Africa - a republic at the southernmost part of Africa; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1910; first European settlers were Dutch (known as Boers)
African - a native or inhabitant of Africa
2.Xhosa - a community of Negroid people in southern South Africa
3.Xhosa - a Bantu language closely related to Zulu
Nguni - a group of southern Bantu languages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Ubuntu, a Xhosan word, means, loosely, "a person is a person through other persons"--both community and ancestry; as Daryl Cloran writes, "This one word [Ubuntu] illuminates both the content of the play and the creative process itself" (i).
Molora opens as a chorus of six Xhosan women and one man remove a groundcloth revealing a hump of dirt center stage.
It is easy to list increasing incidents of violence associated with ethnic difference throughout the world: orthodox Jews and African-Americans in Crown Heights, Brooklyn; Serbs, Croats, and Muslims in the former Yugoslavia; Zulus and Xhosans in South Africa; the Irish and the British in the United Kingdom; the Jews and Palestinians in Israel; the Tutsis and Hutu in Rwanda; the list goes on and on.