Chicano

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Related to Xicano: Chicano

Chi·ca·no

 (chĭ-kä′nō, shĭ-)
n. pl. Chi·ca·nos
A Mexican American.

[American Spanish chicano, dialectal variant of mexicano, Mexican, from México, Mexico.]

Chi·ca′no adj.
Usage Note: Chicano is used only of Mexican Americans, not of Mexicans living in Mexico or working as migrants in the United States. While Chicano is a term of pride for many Mexican Americans, it remains a word with strong political associations stemming from the Chicano literary and civil rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Since these politics are not necessarily espoused by all Mexican Americans, and since usage and acceptance of this word can vary from one region to another, an outsider who is unfamiliar with his or her audience would do well to use Mexican American instead. See Usage Note at Hispanic.

chicano

(tʃɪˈkɑːnəʊ)
n, pl -nos
(Peoples) an American citizen of Mexican origin
[C20: from Spanish mejicano Mexican]

Chi•ca•no

(tʃɪˈkɑ noʊ, -ˈkæn oʊ)

n., pl. -nos.
a Mexican-American, esp. a male.
[1960–65; < Mexican Spanish mexicano Mexican]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chicano - a person of Mexican descent
Mexican - a native or inhabitant of Mexico
Translations

Chicano

[tʃɪˈkɑːnəʊ]
A. ADJchicano
B. Nchicano/a m/f

Chicano

n (= Mexican American) pl <Chicanos> → Chicano m
References in periodicals archive ?
In his interrogation of conceptualizations and visual representations of Aztlan throughout a variety of temporalities and spatial constructs, Miner offers a framework that relies heavily on Indigenous studies to understand the artistic creation of various manifestations of Aztlan as foundational for Xicano sovereignty and integral to overcoming the legacy of settler-colonialism.
Indeed, recent exhibitions such as LA Xicano have demonstrated the diverse and at times unexpected nature of cultural production in this context, displaying work that often evades conventional frames of identity politics or ideological agendas (Noriega, Romo, and Tompkins Rivas 2011).
I spell Xicana and Xicano (Chicana and Chicano) with an X (the Nahuatl spelling of the 'ch' sound) to indicate a re-emerging polftica, especially among young people, grounded in indigenous American belief systems and identities.
Xicano (Los Angeles: UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press, 2011); C.
As a master accordionist, she has been commissioned to teach accordion classes for the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Xicano music education program in San Antonio for several years.
Reflecting on the spirituality and history of the Xicano way.
The four members of the collective met in the 1990s through Xicano activist circles and a program called "Project Involve" that brought together emerging young filmmakers in the Los Angeles area.
This is due mainly to the fact that Tia Chucha's founders -- Rodriguez, Enrique Sanchez and renowned Xicano writer Luis J.