Hsüan-tsang

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Hsüan-tsang

(ˈʃwɑːn ˈtsæŋ)
n
(Biography) a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for Xuan Zang
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Historians are also speculating that the site may have been mentioned by the 7th century Chinese monk, Xuanzang, in the Great Tang Records on the Western Regions.
The most notable student was the Chinese scholar Xuanzang, who travelled along the Silk Road from Central China to Nalanda.
Chinese scholar-travelers Faxian and Xuanzang, Moroccan traveler Ibn Battuta, and Marco Polo have all written about the city.
(26) According to Faxian, Song Yun and Xuanzang these novel types of relics were kept inside stupas, guarded at night and brought out during the day for worship.
It was, for instance, frequently used in Xuanzang's [phrase omitted] translations of Buddhist sutras.
The conclusions presented in these texts were substantial enough that Tang Xuanzang was able to complete a treatise on translation, The Five Principles.
In the 7th century, during the Tang Dynasty (618-907), Chinese monk Xuanzang travelled westward to seek the Buddhist Sutra, and his book Great Tang Records on the Western Regions mentions the names of areas which are now in Pakistan, and is a testament to his fond memory of the land and the people of those areas.
Among their topics are Dunhuang and two revolutions in the history of the Chinese book, a possible adaptation of the Book of the Giants in the Manichaean Traite, the Rouran Qaghanate and the western regions during the second half of the fifth century based on a Chinese document newly found in Turfan, on the Chinese name for the Syr Darya in Xuanzang's Account of Western Regions, beyond deciphering: an overview of Tocharian studies during the past 30 years, and Kaniska in the Old Turkic tradition.
Hiuen Tsang (also Xuanzang, Hsuan Tsang) was the celebrated Chinese traveler, a Buddhist monk, who visited India in Ancient Times.
Asher's meticulously researched chapter on 'Xuanzang at Nalanda' stands out in this collection.
I'm in search of the birthplace of the monk Xuanzang. His ancient residence is located in Chenhe Village where his descendants still reside, 50 generations removed.