Hsüan-tsung

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Hsüan-tsung

(ˈʃwɑːn ˈtsɒŋ)
n
(Biography) a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for Xuan Zong
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References in periodicals archive ?
A similar case is the hypocorism Chongniang [phrase omitted] (XTS 83.3660), given to the youngest daughter (Princess Shou'an [phrase omitted]) of the Tang Emperor Xuanzong [phrase omitted] (r.
From the same sale of 12 September comes a loocm-high limestone Bodhisattva, a testimony to the fully fledged naturalism and sensuality that characterised the Tang period under the emperor Xuanzong (r.
It was during the Tang period that Monk Xuanzong brought back the Sanskrit from India through the Silk route under the royal Tang mission.
In the ninth century, a white cockatoo, belonging to the Chinese Emperor Xuanzong (Hsuan-tsung) of Tang was killed by a goshawk as it few at a games board (which it was apt to do whenever the emperor was losing).
One Tang emperor Xuanzong demonstrated this on a truly massive scale-half-a-thousand warriors on each side of a rope 150 meters long.
When the rebel general An Lushan [phrase omitted] (703-757 CE) amassed military power in northeast China and captured the Eastern capital Loyang, he declared himself Emperor of Yan [??]--the actual Emperor Xuanzong [phrase omitted] having fled to Chengdu in the South--and captured the Western capital Chang-an [phrase omitted] shortly thereafter.
712-756) set up Nei Jiaofang in 714 (Kaiyuan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 2nd year), "In Kaiyuan 2nd year, Xuanzong set up Nei Jiaofang beside the Penglai Palace ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII])" (Ouyang and Song 816).
During the Tang dynasty, Emperor Xuanzong of Tang promoted large-scale tug-of-war games, using ropes of up to 167 metres or (547.9 feet) with shorter ropes attached and more than 500 people on each end of the rope.
(137) Van der Kuijp says this unnamed emperor would have been the Xuanzong Emperor (r.
Her lover, Xuanzong, the emperor, was so consumed with passion for her that he neglected state affairs, and a rebellion consumed the capital, Xi'an.