Y chromosome

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Y chromosome

or Y-chro·mo·some (wī′krō′mə-sōm′)
n.
The sex chromosome associated with male characteristics in mammals, not occurring in females and occurring with one X chromosome in the male sex-chromosome pair.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Y chromosome



n.
a sex chromosome of humans and most mammals that is present only in males and is paired with an Xchromosome. Compare X chromosome.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Y chromosome - the sex chromosome that is carried by men; "human males normally have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome"
sex chromosome - (genetics) a chromosome that determines the sex of an individual; "mammals normally have two sex chromosomes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At first glance, the experiments would seem to suggest Y chromosomes aren't necessary for reproduction, which hints that evolution may eventually show Y's the door.
Such events yield isodicentric Y chromosomes that contain two centromeres, two copies of some genes, and no copies of other genes (Figure 4B).
al., "The Dual Origin and Siberian Affinities of Native American Y Chromosomes" American Journal of Human Genetics 70 (2002): 192-206; and T.
However, they found that about 8 percent of the men carry Y chromosomes with identical or nearly identical markers, signifying a related ancestry, the researchers report in the online American Journal of Human Genetics.
Y chromosomes are probably lost when cells divide, with some cells failing to divvy up their chromosomes equally.
Without recombination between chromosomes, Y chromosomes tend to degenerate.
The answer lies in the X and Y chromosomes, with males getting one of each and females getting two Xs.
Using some 30 natural genetic markers, Chris Tyler-Smith of the University of Oxford in England and his colleagues classified the Y chromosomes of more than 2,100 men from locations across Asia.
The researchers used 167 chemical markers to probe alterations of nucleotide sequences in the Y chromosomes in modern men.
Yet, she says, "they looked just the same" but carried special Y chromosomes inherited from their mothers.
These livers were initially free of Y chromosomes. At various points between 1 month and 2 years after transplant, 16 to 40 percent of liver cells in these men contained a Y chromosome.