millennium bug

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Related to Y2K bug: Y2k scare

millennium bug

n
(Computer Science) computing any software problem arising from the change in date at the start of the 21st century
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

millen′nium bug`



n.
Informal. a bug that can cause computers or software to misinterpret the first two digits of the year 2000 as 19, due to the coding of dates using only the last two digits of the year.
[1990–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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I'm sure people can remember when we were about to enter the new millennium and there was scaremongering over the Y2K bug, with talk of clocks failing and planes falling out the sky.
Y2K bug fails to launch: If you were watching TV at any point in 1999, you'll remember the mass hysteria that the fear of the Y2K bug produced.
To be sure, that was the same year as computer programmers worldwide took precautions against the so-called Y2k bug that was feared to cause electronic havoc in Jan.
Credit unions were all "green" New Year's weekend as the year 2000 finally arrived and the dreaded Y2K bug moved to center stage.
Ten years ago, during lulls in the talk about how the Y2K bug would cause the world's computers to freeze, people would argue about whether 2000 was the first year of the new decade, century or millennium.
At the time, I was assigned to write an article on the preparations being made by vendors in that field for the impending havoc that would be wreaked upon mankind by the "Y2K bug." That, you'll recall, was the computer glitch caused by the dating limitations of early PCs.
A survey conducted by Dynamic Markets on behalf of LANDesk software, a systems management specialist, has revealed that 62% of IT managers across Europe believe that the security of mobile devices pose a larger threat than the threat posed by the Y2K bug.
Who can forget, for example, in the run-up to the year 2000 the incredible hysteria and fear about the Y2K bug? Since then, we've had increasing fears about terrorism, fears about dirty nukes, fears about super volcanoes in Yellowstone National Park, and, as Crichton argues, the pervasive fear of global warming.
The much-hyped and feared "Y2K bug" and evermore sophisticated computer viruses and hackers have highlighted the risks of computer down time and the cost to businesses.
Indeed AMR said that the furore around corporate governance issues may "kickstart" IT spending in the way that the Y2K bug did in the mid to late 1990s.
Remember a few short years ago when the main worry at the end of December was the Y2K bug? The specter of Y2K+3 makes Y2K look like a walk in the park.
The Y2K bug, a nasty-looking insect, survives the year change to cause new, unpleasant problems.