Yahwism


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Yah·wist

 (yä′wĭst) also Yah·vist (-vĭst)
n.
The putative author of the earliest sources of the Hexateuch in which God is consistently referred to by the Tetragrammaton.

Yah′wism n.
Yah·wis′tic adj.

Yahwism

(ˈjɑːwɪzəm) or

Jahwism

;

Yahvism

(ˈjɑːvɪzəm) or

Jahvism

n
(Bible) the use of the name Yahweh, esp in parts of the Old Testament, as the personal name of God

Yah•wism

(ˈyɑ wɪz əm)

also Yah•vism

(-vɪz-)

n.
the worship of Yahweh or the religious system based on such worship.
[1865–70]

Yahwism

1. the worship of Yahweh (Jehovah).
2. the act or custom of naming Jehovah Yahweh.
See also: Judaism
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References in periodicals archive ?
As noted by Cross, "It is not coincidental that the language of theophany and the imagery of revelation derived from the mythology of the storm god largely fell out of use, beginning in the ninth century, and including the two centuries to follow, in prophetic Yahwism." (32) Furthermore, names with the Baal theophoric element, which were accepted in earlier Israelite religious tradition, were later changed by Hebrew scribes.
Instead, according to Genesis 17, Abraham and Sarah give birth to a multiplicity of nations, only one of which led to the national tradition of Yahwism. This 'inclusive' version of monotheism, which allows for a multiplicity of divine names for the Creator, does not yield a conquest narrative.
Thompson also argued that human sacrifice, specifically the sacrifice of the firstborn child, is represented in the Hebrew Bible as extraordinary and as taking place due to "grave circumstances." It was not part of pure Yahwism; rather, its practice was primarily a result of foreign influence.
In an advisory posted on its website, the agency cautioned consumers against using 'Dok Apo Better Vision 15 mL' eye drops, allegedly manufactured by Yahwism Health and Beauty Products.
Nevertheless, although both henotheistic Yahwism and a diverse polytheism co-existed for some time until after the exile, Hess emphasizes pieces such as the seventh-century Ketef Hinnom amulets to demonstrate the strength of Israelite monotheism.
Can it be that those peoples and societies that stand outside Yahwism, the majority of humanity past and present, not only are less capable of ethical existence on Earth than their Yawhist neighbors, but are, in fact, doomed to an eternity of torture for their inability or unwillingness to embrace the capricious demands of the God of Abraham?
His proposal that Yahwism bound the Hebrew people together at least as early as the late thirteenth or early twelfth centuries, if not earlier (200), is based on the so-called old poetry in the Hebrew Bible, but without detailed study.
He allows Israel to taint itself by the sacrifice of the firstborn." (3) Ezekiel's depiction of YHVH giving Israel "laws leading to death" is consistent with Noort's view that in contemporary scholarship, "[t]he picture of the black-and-white oppositions between Baalism and Yahwism has disappeared." (4)
He ponders such matters as the Aramaic papyri and bullae, the face of the Persian empire and its administration, Yahwism and the question of government in Yehud, and concepts of theocracy.
Yahwism is not traditional Judaism, and a Jew is rarely a Yahwist these days.
Substantial points of difference remain, however, related to the gulf that existed between Egyptian religion and the revelatory theology of Yahwism. From a faith position, it can be said that the Decalogue is God bringing His grace and truth into a world situation in which humanity had already displayed its need for that truth.