mien

(redirected from Yao people)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Mien

 (myĕn)
n.
A Hmong-Mien language spoken by many subgroups of the Yao of China.

mien

 (mēn)
n.
1. Bearing or manner, especially as it reveals an inner state of mind: a colonel with an imperious mien.
2. An appearance or aspect. "Eyes fixed in a piercing squint ... his was a mien that made an easy target for political cartoonists" (Nick Kotz).

[Alteration (influenced by French mine, appearance) of Middle English demeine, demeanor, from Old French, from demener, to behave; see demean1.]

mien

(miːn)
n
literary a person's manner, bearing, or appearance, expressing personality or mood: a noble mien.
[C16: probably variant of obsolete demean appearance; related to French mine aspect]

mien

(min)

n.
air, bearing, or demeanor, as showing character, feeling, etc.: a person of noble mien.
[1505–15; probably aph. variant of demean2; spelled with -ie- to distinguish it from mean2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mien - dignified manner or conductmien - dignified manner or conduct    
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
gravitas, lordliness, dignity - formality in bearing and appearance; "he behaved with great dignity"

mien

noun demeanour, look, air, bearing, appearance, aspect, presence, manner, carriage, aura, countenance, deportment his mild manner and aristocratic mien

mien

noun
1. Behavior through which one reveals one's personality:
Archaic: port.
2. The way something or someone looks:
Translations

mien

[miːn] N (liter) → aire m, porte m, semblante m

mien

n (liter)Miene f

mien

[miːn] n (liter) → contegno
References in periodicals archive ?
The bike tour also goes close to several ethnic minorities such as the Miao, Zhuang, Dong and Yao people.
A history of Daoism and the Yao people of South China.
Drawing on close readings of primary sources, with frequent quotes from these given in the original Chinese with English translation, Alberts presents a fascinating and detailed analysis of the adaptation of daoism by the non-Chinese Yao people and the larger cultural and political meanings and intentions of their conversion.