yeoman

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Related to Yeomen: yeomen of the guard

yeo·man

 (yō′mən)
n.
1.
a. An attendant, servant, or lesser official in a royal or noble household.
b. A yeoman of the guard.
2. A petty officer performing chiefly clerical duties in the US Navy.
3. An assistant or other subordinate, as of a sheriff.
4. A diligent, dependable worker.
5. A farmer who cultivates his own land, especially a member of a former class of small freeholders in England.

[Middle English yeman, yoman, perhaps contraction of yong man, young man (yong, young; see young + man, man; see man), or from Old English *gēaman (from or akin to Old Frisian gāman, villager : , region, district + man, man; see man- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

yeoman

(ˈjəʊmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Historical Terms) history
a. a member of a class of small freeholders of common birth who cultivated their own land
b. an assistant or other subordinate to an official, such as a sheriff, or to a craftsman or trader
c. an attendant or lesser official in a royal or noble household
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Britain) another name for yeoman of the guard
3. (Historical Terms) (modifier) characteristic of or relating to a yeoman
4. (Military) a petty officer or noncommissioned officer in the Royal Navy or Marines in charge of signals
[C15: perhaps from yongman young man]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

yeo•man

(ˈyoʊ mən)

n., pl. -men,
adj. n.
1. an enlisted person in the U.S. Navy whose duties are chiefly clerical.
2. Brit. a farmer who cultivates his own land.
3. (formerly, in England)
a. one of a class of lesser freeholders, below the gentry, who cultivated their own land.
b. an attendant in a royal or other great household.
c. an assistant, as of a sheriff or other official.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to yeomen.
5. (esp. of an arduous task) performed in a loyal, valiant, or workmanlike manner.
[1300–50; Middle English yeman, yoman, probably reduced forms of yengman, yongman, yungman, with similar sense; see young, man]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yeoman - officer in the (ceremonial) bodyguard of the British monarchyeoman - officer in the (ceremonial) bodyguard of the British monarch
bodyguard, escort - someone who escorts and protects a prominent person
2.yeoman - in former times was free and cultivated his own land
freeholder - the owner of a freehold
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

yeoman

[ˈjəʊmən] N (yeomen (pl)) (Brit) (Hist)
1. (also yeoman farmer) → pequeño propietario m, terrateniente m rural
2. (Mil) → soldado m (voluntario) de caballería
yeoman of the guardalabardero m de la Casa Real
to give yeoman serviceprestar grandes servicios
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

yeoman

[ˈjəʊmən] n
Yeoman of the Guard → hallebardier m de la garde royale
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

yeoman

n pl <-men>
(Hist: = small landowner) → Freibauer m; yeoman farmer (Hist) → Freibauer m
Yeoman of the Guardköniglicher Leibgardist; to do yeoman servicetreue Dienste leisten (for sb jdm)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

yeoman

[ˈjəʊmən] n (-men (pl)) (Brit) (old) → piccolo proprietario terriero
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
No archer ever lived that could speed a gray goose shaft with such skill and cunning as his, nor were there ever such yeomen as the sevenscore merry men that roamed with him through the greenwood shades.
"Now," quoth he, "my bow and eke mine arrows are as good as shine; and moreover, I go to the shooting match at Nottingham Town, which same has been proclaimed by our good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire; there I will shoot with other stout yeomen, for a prize has been offered of a fine butt of ale."
So, in all that year, fivescore or more good stout yeomen gathered about Robin Hood, and chose him to be their leader and chief.
But now the distant twigs and branches rustled with the coming of men, and suddenly a score or two of good stout yeomen, all clad in Lincoln green, burst from out the covert, with merry Will Stutely at their head.
After which the yeomen gave three cheers for the Queen and three more for her page, and drank toasts to them both, rising to their feet.
The next morning was as fine a summer's day as ever you want to see, and the green leaves of the forest made a pleasing background for the gay picture of the yeomen setting forth.
She had heard of the fame of Robin Hood and his yeomen, as Marian had said; and Marian on her part had been overjoyed to be able to add a word in their favor and to set out in search of them.
The yeomen guard the streets in seemly bands; And clowns come crowding on, with cudgels in their hands.
Squires, pages, and yeomen in rich liveries, waited around this place of honour, which was designed for Prince John and his attendants.
The lower and interior space was soon filled by substantial yeomen and burghers, and such of the lesser gentry, as, from modesty, poverty, or dubious title, durst not assume any higher place.
Yeomen prickers they are, who tend to the King's hunt.
"Indeed, your high and mighty grace," sneered one of the yeomen, "have you in sooth so ordained?"