yersinia


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yer·sin·i·a

 (yər-sĭn′ē-ə)
n. pl. yer·sin·i·ae (-ē-ē′)
A gram-negative bacterium of the genus Yersinia that causes various diseases in animals and humans, including plague.

[From New Latin Yersinia, genus name, after Alexandre Émile Jean Yersin (1863-1943), Swiss-born French bacteriologist.]

yersinia

(jɜːˈsɪnɪə)
n
any rodlike Gram-negative bacterium of the genus Yersinia, the cause of yersiniosis
Translations

yersinia

n. yersinia. gene del tipo de especie Yersinia pestis, bacteria parasítica en humanos, que no forma esporas y contiene bastoncillos de células ovoides, gramma negativas.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent microbiological survey recovered a very low prevalence of Yersinia species from surface soils (165), yet burrow contamination and retention appears a likely source (166).
coli 0157, vibrio and yersinia did not decline significantly, and the estimated incidence of cryptosporidium --commonly a waterborne pathogen--actually increased when compared with the previous three years.
The search was conducted to find an ICD diagnostic-related group (DRG) code specifically for infection with Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Shigella species, and Salmonella species.
By recreating growth conditions in flea carriers and mammal hosts, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have uncovered 176 proteins and likely proteins in the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis whose numbers rise and fall with the virulence of the disease.
Yersinia enterocolitiea is a gram-negative rod-shaped enteropathogen closely related to Eseherichia coli.
Following an overview of the basic functioning of the immune system and in the healthy and hypersensitive gut, they present an A-Z description of GI diseases from allergic proctocolitis to Yersinia entercolitis and their major immunologic features and assumed immunogenesis.
At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandra McCutchen-Maloney studies Yersinia pestis, the cause of bubonic plague.
The document cited in the article, "Bioterrorism readiness plan: A template for health care facilities," produced by the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology in conjunction with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states: "Plague is an acute bacterial disease caused by the gram-negative bacillus Yersinia pestis, which is usually transmitted by infected fleas, resulting in lymphatic and blood infections (bubonic and septicemia plague).
Another common pathogen was diseases caused by yersinia bacteria, which caused more than 10,000 human cases.
Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative, nonsporulating coccobacillus responsible for causing plague.
From 1996 through 2004, the time period in which the agency's FoodNet surveillance system has been tracking the incidence of food-borne illness, Escherichia coli O157 infections decreased by 47%, whereas Cryptosporidium infections dropped 40%, and Yersinia, 45%.
With the discovery of the modern plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis, in 1894, the issue seemed resolved: the Black Death was the disease now known as bubonic plague.