yersinia


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Related to yersinia: Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

yer·sin·i·a

 (yər-sĭn′ē-ə)
n. pl. yer·sin·i·ae (-ē-ē′)
A gram-negative bacterium of the genus Yersinia that causes various diseases in animals and humans, including plague.

[From New Latin Yersinia, genus name, after Alexandre Émile Jean Yersin (1863-1943), Swiss-born French bacteriologist.]

yersinia

(jɜːˈsɪnɪə)
n
any rodlike Gram-negative bacterium of the genus Yersinia, the cause of yersiniosis
Translations

yersinia

n. yersinia. gene del tipo de especie Yersinia pestis, bacteria parasítica en humanos, que no forma esporas y contiene bastoncillos de células ovoides, gramma negativas.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Verigene Enteric Pathogens Test (EP) (510(k) cleared) is a multiplexed, automated test for the detection of the most common causes of acute gastroenteritis, including Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Vibrio, Yersinia enterocolitica, Shiga Toxin 1, Shiga Toxin 2, Norovirus, and Rotavirus.
The ancestor of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis causes mild stomach disease.
The Yersinia species of pathogens can cause the bubonic plague and serious gastrointestinal infections in humans.
New Zealand is facing the outbreak of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, which has been described as a food poisoning epidemic.
To the Editor: Yersinia pestis (family Enterobacteriaceae) is a bacterium that can cause high rates of death in susceptible mammals and can provoke septicemic, pneumonic, and bubonic plague in humans (1).
Washington, May 11 ( ANI ): Scientists have confirmed that the Justinianic Plague of the sixth to eighth centuries was caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.
Microbiologists, infectious disease specialists, pathologists, and other medical researchers draw on principles and techniques of systems biology to study Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes the bubonic plague, and other members of the genus Yersinia.
The bacterium that causes the plague, Yersinia pestis, still exists, though the disease occurs rarely these days, and when it does it is seldom lethal.
These represented 21 cases of Mycobacterium avium complex (60%), 1 Mycobacterium fortuitum (3%), 7 B henselae (20%), 2 Yersinia enterocolitica (7%), 1 F tularensis (3%) and 1 Streptococcus pyogenes (3%) (Table 2).
The researchers found that a specific strain of the plague bug Yersinia pestis caused the pandemic that killed 100 million Europeans - between 30% and 50% of the total population - in just five years between 1347 and 1351.