Zamyatin

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Zamyatin

(Russian zaˈmjatjin)
n
(Biography) Yevgenii Ivanovich (jɪvˈɡjenij ɪˈvanəvitʃ). 1884–1937, Russian novelist and writer, in Paris from 1931, whose works include satirical studies of provincial life in Russia and England, where he worked during World War I, and the dystopian novel We (1924)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Wells's The Sleeper Awakes, Yevgeny Zamyatin's We, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World--are familiar from many critical studies.
The ship was built under the supervision of a Russian marine engineer, Yevgeny Zamyatin, who lived in Jesmond during the construction of the Svyatogor and in later years was also a science fiction writer and political satirist.
In the first category, you'll find The Night Manager, by [John] le Carre; A Natural, by Ross Raisin; The Balkan Trilogy, by Olivia Manning; Counternarratives, by John Keene; and We, by Yevgeny Zamyatin. In the second category there are three books about the history of the Devil; one book about magic in the Middle Ages; Doctor Faustus, by Thomas Mann; Faust, by Goethe; a lot of books about Russia.
In his satirical dystopia, We, Yevgeny Zamyatin has his heroine
In the early '90s, she optioned Russian author Yevgeny Zamyatin's short story "The Flood," making the film with a little-known Ukrainian director.
WE | YEVGENY ZAMYATIN (1924): In the 26th century, everyone lives for the collective good of the One State, which is governed by the omnipotent "Benefactor." In a world where personal freedom does not exist, a mathematician named D-503 undergoes the most revolutionary experience possible: he falls in love.
Accordingly, figures such as Yevgeny Zamyatin and Alexander Bogdanov tend to disrupt the binary opposition of literary fiction and sci-fi in a way that hardly happened in Britain until the experiments of J.
Drawing on disparate examples such as Yevgeny Zamyatin's We (1924) and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale (1985), Parrinder suggests that utopian narratives which claim historical believability frequently utilize the image of a perpetually mobilized population to illustrate the dystopic nature of such a fantasy.
And the book issue is further exacerbated by my boyfriend's collection - we rival Cardiff Central Library with our collected volumes, all those Ikea bookcases groaning under the strain of collected works by authors from Martin Amis to Yevgeny Zamyatin and everything in between, not to mention Beano annuals, a complete collection of Nigella's cookbooks and a variety of academic texts left over from our university days.
If we are to believe such incisive dystopian writers as Yevgeny Zamyatin, Aldous Huxley, and George Orwell, or such groundbreaking social theorists as Michel Foucault and Zygmunt Bauman, modernity always was, and continues to be, obsessed with how to get as much control over the human body and soul as possible without physically exterminating people.
Le Guin's anarchist utopian science fiction novel The Dispossessed, first published in 1974, as well as writings by Yevgeny Zamyatin (We in particular) and H.G.