Yiddish


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Yid·dish

 (yĭd′ĭsh)
n.
The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian.

[Yiddish yidish, Jewish, Yiddish, from Middle High German jüdisch, Jewish, from jude, jüde, Jew, from Old High German judo, from Latin Iūdaeus; see Jew.]

Yid′dish adj.

Yiddish

(ˈjɪdɪʃ)
n
(Languages) a language spoken as a vernacular by Jews in Europe and elsewhere by Jewish emigrants, usually written in the Hebrew alphabet. Historically, it is a dialect of High German with an admixture of words of Hebrew, Romance, and Slavonic origin, developed in central and E Europe during the Middle Ages
adj
(Languages) in or relating to this language
[C19: from German jüdisch, from Jude Jew]

Yid•dish

(ˈyɪd ɪʃ)

n.
1. a language of central and E European Jews and their descendants elsewhere: based on Rhenish dialects of Middle High German with an admixture of vocabulary from Hebrew and Aramaic, the Slavic languages, and other sources, and written in the Hebrew alphabet.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Yiddish.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other wordsYiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a devious trick; a bit of cheating; "how did you ever fall for a shtik like that?"
pisha paysha - (Yiddish) a card game for two players one of whom is usually a child; the deck is place face down with one card face upward; players draw from the deck alternately hoping to build up or down from the open card; the player with the fewest cards when the deck is exhausted is the winner
meshugaas, mishegaas, mishegoss - (Yiddish) craziness; senseless behavior or activity
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a prank or piece of clowning; "his shtik made us laugh"
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a contrived and often used bit of business that a performer uses to steal attention; "play it straight with no shtik"
tsuris - (Yiddish) aggravating trouble; "the frustrating tsuris he subjected himself to"
chachka, tchotchke, tsatske, tshatshke - (Yiddish) an inexpensive showy trinket
schmaltz, schmalz, shmaltz - (Yiddish) excessive sentimentality in art or music
chutzpa, chutzpah, hutzpah - (Yiddish) unbelievable gall; insolence; audacity
schmegegge, shmegegge - (Yiddish) baloney; hot air; nonsense
German language, High German, German - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
shmooze - (Yiddish) a warm heart-to-heart talk
kvetch - (Yiddish) a nagging complaint
megillah - (Yiddish) a long boring tediously detailed account; "he insisted on giving us the whole megillah"
tsoris - (Yiddish) trouble and suffering
nosh - (Yiddish) a snack or light meal
knish - (Yiddish) a baked or fried turnover filled with potato or meat or cheese; often eaten as a snack
bagel, beigel - (Yiddish) glazed yeast-raised doughnut-shaped roll with hard crust
mishpachah, mishpocha - (Yiddish) the entire family network of relatives by blood or marriage (and sometimes close friends); "she invited the whole mishpocha"
schmear, schmeer, shmear - (Yiddish) a batch of things that go together; "he bought the whole schmeer"
chachka, tchotchke, tchotchkeleh, tsatske, tshatshke - (Yiddish) an attractive, unconventional woman
chutzpanik - (Yiddish) a person characterized by chutzpa
ganef, ganof, gonif, goniff - (Yiddish) a thief or dishonest person or scoundrel (often used as a general term of abuse)
kibitzer - (Yiddish) a meddler who offers unwanted advice to others
klutz - (Yiddish) a clumsy dolt
knocker - (Yiddish) a big shot who knows it and acts that way; a boastful immoderate person
kvetch - (Yiddish) a constant complainer
mensch, mensh - a decent responsible person with admirable characteristics
meshuggeneh, meshuggener - (Yiddish) a crazy fool
nebbech, nebbish - (Yiddish) a timid unfortunate simpleton
nudnick, nudnik - (Yiddish) someone who is a boring pest
putz - (Yiddish) a fool; an idiot
schlemiel, shlemiel - (Yiddish) a dolt who is a habitual bungler
schlep, schlepper, shlep, shlepper - (Yiddish) an awkward and stupid person
schlimazel, shlimazel - (Yiddish) a very unlucky or inept person who fails at everything
schmo, schmuck, shmo, shmuck - (Yiddish) a jerk
schnook, shnook - (Yiddish) a gullible simpleton more to be pitied than despised; "don't be such an apologetic shnook"
schnorrer, shnorrer - (Yiddish) a scrounger who takes advantage of the generosity of others
shegetz - an offensive term for non-Jewish young man; "why does she like all those shkotzim?"
shiksa, shikse - a derogatory term used by Jews to refer to non-Jewish women
yenta - (Yiddish) a woman who talks too much; a gossip unable to keep a secret; a woman who spreads rumors and scandal
yenta - (Yiddish) a vulgar shrew; a shallow coarse termagant
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a little; a piece; "give him a shtik cake"; "he's a shtik crazy"; "he played a shtik Beethoven"
schemozzle, shemozzle - (Yiddish) a confused situation or affair; a mess
Translations
jidiš
jiddisch
yiddishyidiche
jiddischjiddisk
Idiş
Jiddisch

Yiddish

[ˈjɪdɪʃ]
A. ADJjudío
B. N (Ling) → yíd(d)ish m, judeo-alemán m

Yiddish

[ˈjɪdɪʃ]
n (= language) → yiddish m
adjyiddish inv

Yiddish

adjjiddisch
n (Ling) → Jiddisch nt

Yiddish

[ˈjɪdɪʃ] adj & nyiddish (m) inv
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1892, playwright Jacob Gordin premiered The Yiddish King Lear.
Kadar, a scholar of Yiddish literature and history, provides an exhaustive review of the aims, contents, rhetorical method, and style of Yiddish magazines written expressly for American Jewish immigrant children who attended Yiddish supplementary schools from the interwar years through the establishment of the State of Israel and into the heyday of postwar American Jewish adjustment--all historical backdrops that significantly influence her subject matter and thus her analysis of its creation and propagation.
The minority language is the Yiddish spoken by several small and segregated ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in Israel, who maintain Yiddish as a spoken language in daily used, in spite of the ever-growing pressure of the majority language--Israeli Hebrew.
While Yiddish literature was a medium expressing and celebrating universalist concerns for social justice, the Jewish left did not abandon its particularistic Yiddish culture and concerns for national emancipation.
Yehoash himself only lived to see the first two Yiddish volumes of his translation (the Pentateuch) in book form.
Yiddish theater arrived in New York in 1882 while still in its infancy.
The book under review includes four parts: first, an orientation in Ashkenazic culture, book culture, and Basel as a book publishing center; second, a description of the Basel Yiddish corpus; third, a discussion of the authors, typesetters, proofreaders, correctors, and editors involved in the production of the books, as well as the cultural significance of the industry; finally, a bibliography and catalog of the corpus, with facsimile title pages.
Among the factors contributing to the complexity were the development of both modern Hebrew and Yiddish as national languages, starkly divergent Jewish political groupings, and the muddled issue of the religious--cultural-linguistic elements that would make up the modern Jew.
Instead, we find a series of case studies of the "persistence" of Yiddish language.
By contrast, in Abigail Wood's wonderful new monograph And We're All Brothers: Singing in Yiddish in Contemporary North America, the divergent ethical and religious streams of Yiddish folk music are examined.
Critique: An impressively written, organized and presented work of remarkably detailed research, "Survivors and Exiles: Yiddish Culture after the Holocaust" is a truly seminal work of exceptional scholarship.
Lansky, author of "Outwitting History: The Amazing Adventures of a Man Who Rescued a Million Yiddish Books,'' will describe how rescued Yiddish books and recordings are being made accessible through digitalization and translation, and how a new generation is discovering these treasures.