Yiddisher

Yiddisher

(ˈjɪdɪʃə)
adj
1. (Languages) in or relating to Yiddish
2. (Peoples) Jewish
3. (Judaism) Jewish
n
4. (Languages) a speaker of Yiddish; Jew
5. (Peoples) a speaker of Yiddish; Jew
6. (Judaism) a speaker of Yiddish; Jew
References in periodicals archive ?
He was in and out of prison from the age of 19, and while at Florida State Prison at the beginning of 1974, began corresponding with Angela Covic, a San Francisco divorcee he called his "Yiddisher Angel."
"YKUF" stands for Yiddisher Kulktur Farband, INC." The collection was "sponsored," we're informed, by "The Hollywood Emma Lazarus Club of Los Angeles." Filled with selections by famous and now virtually unknown figures, perhaps The New Country will, one day, be reprinted.
They contrive to avoid hard muscular labor." (60) Ross observed that the second generation improved, but suggested that "it will be long before they produce the stoical type who blithely fares forth into the wilderness, portaging his canoe, poling it against the current, wading in the torrents living on bacon and beans, and sleeping on the ground." The comedy films Der Yiddisher Cowboy (1910) and Der Yidisher Kauboy (1911), mocked Jewish ineptitude on the frontier and popularized these stereotypes.
Adler was perhaps best known for his triumphant turns in two Shakespeare productions: Der Yiddisher King Lear (The Jewish King Lear), which transposed the dramatic action to 19th-century Russia, and Shaylok, oder der Koyfman Fun Venedig (Shylock, or The Merchant of Venice), which featured a sympathetic, naturalistic portrait of the Jewish moneylender.
The membership of "The Ten" overlapped that of the other organizations, some Jewish, some not: Louis Lozowick and Ben-Zion (Benzion Weinman) were members of the Yiddisher Kultur Farband (Jewish Culture Association, YKUF), for example, and all the artists belonged to the American Artists' Congress.
Goodbye my Yiddisher Momma.) - Your brokenhearted daughter Marlene.
When I was a child, around the age of six, I often amused family guests by telling them that I am a 'yiddisher kinder'--a phrase I heard from my Jewish grandma ...
This troupe was succeeded by another headed by Elias Geltman, the Dramatishe Sekzie of the Yiddisher Kultur Tsenter, and during 1924-25 it performed seven Yiddish plays.
Due, I think, to displaying such a keen interest in him, he would call me 'the boy with a Yiddisher Kopf' (shrewd mind).
He derides the secular Jewish intellectuals--the "plate-lickers of non-Jewish culture," detached from the wellsprings of Jewish tradition--who "were blinded by the light of western civilization" and who could not therefore "appreciate the value of the small fire of our eternal light" (see Faierstein, "Appendix," where he also translates Heschel's article, "After Majdanek: On Aaron Zeitlin's New Poems," in Yiddisher Kemfer 19, no.
Saul Bellow's character Humboldt, a temporary faculty member at Princeton in the early 1950s, speaks no German, and sees himself as "a Yiddisher mouse in these great Christian houses." Lyotard's observation that Auschwitz is a sign that remains to be phrased, and Adorno's writings on repression, disavowal and foreclosure provide theoretical frameworks through which to understand a postwar refusal to enact Jewishness.
Trunk's 'Der yiddisher poypst: historisher dertsteylung' (1958) is at once a reworking of the Jewish Pope myth and a 'dramatization and a defence' of Shimen Dubnov's Diaspora nationalism.