Yinglish


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Yinglish

(ˈjɪŋɡlɪʃ)
n
(Languages) a dialect of English spoken esp by Jewish immigrants to New York, and heavily influenced by Yiddish constructions and loan words. Also: Yenglish
[from Yi(ddish) + (E)nglish]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) Similar blends are Arablish, Chinglish, Czenglish, Denglisch, Dunglish, Finglish, Heblish, Hinglish, Konglish, Poglish, Runglish, Serblish, Swenglish, Yinglish, etc.
(20) These are Yinglish words that appeared in Leo Rosten's The Joys of Yiddish in 1968 because they were beginning to be more commonly encountered in American English, (21) but it is also not unheard of for Goldstein to include a complete Yiddish phrase in an appropriate context.
Season 2 features Roseanne using Yiddish words on three occasions, and while these terms had largely crossed over into "Yinglish" by this time, the circumstance of their usage still merits attention.
He points to the broad tastes and interests of the Oxford antiquary Thomas Warton, who edited an anthology of English and Scottish poets entitled The Union (1753), on the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Union of the Crowns, and whose History of Yinglish Poetry (1774-81) incorporated Welsh and Scottish matter; to Macaulay's invocation of the 'Literature of Great Britain' at the launch of the Edinburgh Philosophical Institution in 1846; and to the work of Masson, who gave the seventeenth century 'a Scottish accent'.
For example, in my book, Mitzvah Girls: Bringing Up the Next Generation of Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn (2009), I not only included transcripts of interactions in homes, schools and other neighborhood contexts in Yiddish and English, but I also analyzed the distinctive languages that Hasidic men and women speak: Hasidic Yiddish and Hasidic English (called "Yinglish" by many in the community).
The relatives kept the specter of loneliness at bay by bringing with them their Jewishness as embodied in theft interests, their points of view, their stresses, their styles, all expressed in the tserbrokhene language of Yinglish. They reminded my brother and me of characters in a never-ending soap opera we called Shrei Gevalt.
I consequently picked up a lot of Yiddish or Yinglish words and expressions as a kid without any idea that they were Yiddish.
(Ginsberg 1977, 156) Ginsberg's fondness for puns and for linguistic slippages--evident in lines like "Do big fat American people know their Seoul from a hole in the ground?"--also seems to connect his poetry to Groucho's (and Chico Marx's) humor, and to his and the Marx's Yiddish-English speaking ancestors, whose "Yinglish" dialects demonstrate the very sort of malapropisms, puns, and non sequiturs that long served as the foundation for many Jewish comics and arguably for Ginsberg's poetics.
This has produced Spanglish, a hybrid familiar to Americans, especially those who reside in Latin American immigration centers, and also Chinglish in Hong Kong, Singlish in Singapore, Yorlish among Yoruba-speakers in Lagos, Nigeria, and Yinglish among Yiddish-speaking immigrants in the United States and the United Kingdom.
Finally, to understand what New Yorkers are talking about (tawkinabow), any newcomer unfamiliar with Basic Yinglish will need to take a crash course to grasp such classic locutions as shlep (to lug, carry), kvetch (complain, whine), shmuck (a dope, jerk, in Yiddish a penis), shmeer (to spread or a spread), and oy (an untranslatable exclamation that Leo Rosten describes as not a word but a vocabulary).
In between those two bookends, the connected stories are peopled with a procession of characters ranging from Aunt Gerty and her husband-to-be Big Red, mob connected and Jewishly illiterate; mingled with them are Braverman the choir director, the neighborhood kids, the memory of father's doomed family in Poland, the ubiquity of ritual, synagogue, and Talmud, affianced to Hebrew, Yinglish, and the polyglot culture of New York before and after World War II.
He published a number of poems and stories in "Yinglish," his parents' butchered argot, but that was solely for comic effect.