Isaac

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Related to Yishaq: Abram

I·saac

 (ī′zək)
In the Bible, the son of Abraham who was offered as a sacrifice to God. The sacrifice was prevented at the last moment by divine intervention.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Isaac

(ˈaɪzək)
n
(Bible) an Old Testament patriarch, the son of Abraham and Sarah and father of Jacob and Esau (Genesis 17; 21–27)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

I•saac

(ˈaɪ zək)

n.
a son of Abraham and Sarah, and father of Jacob. Gen. 21:1–4.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Isaac - (Old Testament) the second patriarchIsaac - (Old Testament) the second patriarch; son of Abraham and Sarah who was offered by Abraham as a sacrifice to God; father of Jacob and Esau
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Isak
Isaak
IisakIisakki
Isaac
Isak
Isak

Isaac

[ˈaɪzək] NIsaac
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Isaac

[ˈaɪzək] nIsacco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The commander of Ottomans, Ozdemir-oglu Osman Pasha, who was the son of Ozdemir Pasha, accepts the alliance with Yishaq. This alliance was critical for Osman Pasha, mainly because this could give him the chance to regain what was lost during his father's death around Arkiko, Debora and Masawwa zone.
Hiyya bar Abba," as does also the quotation of this passage by the fifteenth-century homilist Isaac Arama in his 'Aqedat Yishaq.