York


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Related to York: York University

York 1

 (yôrk)
Ruling house of England that from 1461 to 1485 produced three kings of England—Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III. During the Wars of the Roses its symbol was a white rose.

York′ist adj. & n.

York 2

 (yôrk)
1. A city of northern England on the Ouse River northeast of Leeds. Originally a Celtic settlement, it was later held by Romans, Angles, Danes, and Normans.
2. A city of southern Pennsylvania south-southeast of Harrisburg. Settled in 1735, it was the meeting place of the Continental Congress in 1777-1778 during the British occupation of Philadelphia.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

york

(jɔːk)
vb
(Cricket) (tr) cricket to bowl or try to bowl (a batsman) by pitching the ball under or just beyond the bat
[C19: back formation from yorker]

York

(jɔːk)
n
1. (Placename) a historic city in NE England, in York unitary authority, North Yorkshire, on the River Ouse: the military capital of Roman Britain; capital of the N archiepiscopal province of Britain since 625, with a cathedral (the Minster) begun in 1154; noted for its cycle of medieval mystery plays; unusually intact medieval walls; university (1963). Pop: 137 505 (2001). Latin name: Eboracum
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in NE England, in North Yorkshire. Pop: 183 100 (2003 est). Area: 272 sq km (105 sq miles)
3. (Placename) Cape York a cape in NE Australia, in Queensland at the N tip of the Cape York Peninsula, extending into the Torres Strait: the northernmost point of Australia

York

(jɔːk)
n
1. (Biography) the English royal house that reigned from 1461 to 1485 and was descended from Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (1411–60), whose claim to the throne precipitated the Wars of the Roses. His sons reigned as Edward IV and Richard III
2. (Biography) Alvin C(ullum). 1887–1964, US soldier and hero of World War I
3. (Biography) Duke of, full name Prince Frederick Augustus, Duke of York and Albany. 1763–1827, second son of George III of Great Britain and Ireland. An undistinguished commander-in-chief of the British army (1798–1809), he is the "grand old Duke of York" of the nursery rhyme
4. (Biography) Prince Andrew, Duke of. born 1960, second son of Elizabeth II of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He married (1986) Miss Sarah Ferguson; they divorced in 1996; their first daughter, Princess Beatrice of York, was born in 1988 and their second, Princess Eugenie of York, in 1990
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

York

(yɔrk)

n.
1. a member of the royal house of England that ruled from 1461 to 1485.
2. 1st Duke of (Edmund of Langley), 1341–1402, progenitor of the house of York (son of Edward III).
3. Alvin Cullum (Sergeant), 1887–1964, U.S. soldier.
5. Ancient, Eboracum. a city in North Yorkshire, in NE England, on the Ouse: the capital of Roman Britain. 104,000.
6. a city in SE Pennsylvania: meeting of the Continental Congress 1777–78. 44,619.
7. an estuary in E Virginia, flowing SE into Chesapeake Bay. 40 mi. (64 km) long.
8. Cape, a cape at the NE extremity of Australia.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

york


Past participle: yorked
Gerund: yorking

Imperative
york
york
Present
I york
you york
he/she/it yorks
we york
you york
they york
Preterite
I yorked
you yorked
he/she/it yorked
we yorked
you yorked
they yorked
Present Continuous
I am yorking
you are yorking
he/she/it is yorking
we are yorking
you are yorking
they are yorking
Present Perfect
I have yorked
you have yorked
he/she/it has yorked
we have yorked
you have yorked
they have yorked
Past Continuous
I was yorking
you were yorking
he/she/it was yorking
we were yorking
you were yorking
they were yorking
Past Perfect
I had yorked
you had yorked
he/she/it had yorked
we had yorked
you had yorked
they had yorked
Future
I will york
you will york
he/she/it will york
we will york
you will york
they will york
Future Perfect
I will have yorked
you will have yorked
he/she/it will have yorked
we will have yorked
you will have yorked
they will have yorked
Future Continuous
I will be yorking
you will be yorking
he/she/it will be yorking
we will be yorking
you will be yorking
they will be yorking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been yorking
you have been yorking
he/she/it has been yorking
we have been yorking
you have been yorking
they have been yorking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been yorking
you will have been yorking
he/she/it will have been yorking
we will have been yorking
you will have been yorking
they will have been yorking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been yorking
you had been yorking
he/she/it had been yorking
we had been yorking
you had been yorking
they had been yorking
Conditional
I would york
you would york
he/she/it would york
we would york
you would york
they would york
Past Conditional
I would have yorked
you would have yorked
he/she/it would have yorked
we would have yorked
you would have yorked
they would have yorked
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.York - the English royal house (a branch of the Plantagenet line) that reigned from 1461 to 1485; its emblem was a white rose
dynasty - a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
royal family, royal house, royal line, royalty - royal persons collectively; "the wedding was attended by royalty"
Richard III - King of England from 1483 to 1485; seized the throne from his nephew Edward V who was confined to the Tower of London and murdered; his reign ended when he was defeated by Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) at the battle of Bosworth Field (1452-1485)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ヨークヨーク家
Eboracum
References in classic literature ?
"Drive to the Duchess of B 's," she said, and then after a pause, "Are you never going to get those horses' heads up, York? Raise them at once and let us have no more of this humoring and nonsense."
York came to me first, while the groom stood at Ginger's head.
York came with her and gave his orders, and then came to look at me.
The City of New York was in the year of the German attack the largest, richest, in many respects the most splendid, and in some, the wickedest city the world had ever seen.
In half an hour New York had passed from serene sunset and gaping admiration to a troubled and threatening twilight.
With the cessation of the traffic an unusual stillness came upon New York, and the disturbing concussions of the futile defending guns on the hills about grew more and more audible.
The Real Character of the Executive From the New York Packet.
This will scarcely, however, be considered as a point upon which any comparison can be grounded; for if, in this particular, there be a resemblance to the king of Great Britain, there is not less a resemblance to the Grand Seignior, to the khan of Tartary, to the Man of the Seven Mountains, or to the governor of New York.
In these circumstances there is a total dissimilitude between him and a king of Great Britain, who is an hereditary monarch, possessing the crown as a patrimony descendible to his heirs forever; but there is a close analogy between him and a governor of New York, who is elected for three years, and is re-eligible without limitation or intermission.
It was generally agreed in New York that the Countess Olenska had "lost her looks."
She had appeared there first, in Newland Archer's boyhood, as a brilliantly pretty little girl of nine or ten, of whom people said that she "ought to be painted." Her parents had been continental wanderers, and after a roaming babyhood she had lost them both, and been taken in charge by her aunt, Medora Manson, also a wanderer, who was herself returning to New York to "settle down."
As her mother had been a Rushworth, and her last unhappy marriage had linked her to one of the crazy Chiverses, New York looked indulgently on her eccentricities; but when she returned with her little orphaned niece, whose parents had been popular in spite of their regrettable taste for travel, people thought it a pity that the pretty child should be in such hands.