Yoruba

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Yo·ru·ba

 (yôr′ə-bə, yō-ro͝o-bä′)
n. pl. Yoruba or Yo·ru·bas
1. A member of a West African people living chiefly in southwest Nigeria.
2. The Benue-Congo language of this people.

Yo′ru·ban adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Yoruba

(ˈjɒrʊbə)
npl -bas or -ba
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of W Africa, living chiefly in the coastal regions of SW Nigeria: noted for their former city-states and complex material culture, particularly as evidenced in their music, art, and sculpture
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo family
ˈYoruban adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Yo•ru•ba

(ˈyɔr ə bə, ˈyoʊr-)

n., pl. -bas, (esp. collectively) -ba.
1. a member of an African people or group of peoples of SW Nigeria, Benin, and Togo.
2. the Kwa language of the Yoruba.
Yo′ru•ban, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yoruba - a member of a West African people living chiefly in southwestern Nigeria
Nigerian - a native or inhabitant of Nigeria
2.Yoruba - a Kwa language spoken by the Yoruba in southwestern Nigeria
Kwa - a group of African language in the Niger-Congo group spoken from the Ivory Coast east to Nigeria
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Yoruba
yoruba
iorubaiorubá
yoruba
Yoruba
References in periodicals archive ?
Oba Adeyemi said this on Wednesday shortly after holding a closed-door meeting with the Aare Onakakanfo of Yorubaland, Iba Gani Adams, who paid a visit to him at his palace in Oyo.
Among their topics are the impoverishment of Africa by the West's multinational corporations: a case of multinational corporations in Nigeria's delta region, foraging to survive: poverty and shifting consumer dynamics in rural Zimbabwe between 2000 and 2008, the emergence of the cycle of poverty and traditional systems for poverty eradication in Yorubaland: insights from the biblical Ruth and Naomi, disempowerment and impoverishment of African communities: re-visiting the effects of land grabbing by foreigners in Africa, and corruption and failures of various poverty alleviation programs: a historical appraisal of Nigeria from 1985 to 2015.
Women's economic independence in precolonial Yorubaland has been extensively documented.
Prior to the colonial era, Shari'ah was applied in the north and part of Yorubaland otherwise known as southwestern Nigeria.
Queen B is actually channeling the African Orisha Goddess Oshun that stems from the Yoruba culture of Yorubaland. Oshun's traditional colors are yellow, gold, and amber.
In this collection of the author's previously published and unpublished papers and field notes, Usman (anthropology, Arizona State U.) describes societies, migrations, and social interactions in Nigeria's Northern Yorubaland from pre-colonial times to the early 20th century, drawing on anthropological and historical sources.
"Samuel Johnson of Yorubaland, 1846-1901: Religio-cultural Identity in a Changing Environment and the Making of a Mission Agent."
But there appear to be more twins in Yorubaland than anywhere else in the world.
In Lagos and the rest of Yorubaland, Obasanjo was blamed for a bloody crackdown on students protesting tuition hikes.
And yet, at the heart of this amazing volatility of competing interests between the Ifa diviners and the larger orisha milieu, there remains the enduring ritual of the Ifa ceremony in question--a near snapshot of emic testimonies from nineteenth century Yorubaland (3)--which is overlooked in Brown's study.
His mission field was Yorubaland in southwestern Nigeria, where he labored from 1850 to 1856.