Yser

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Yser

(French izɛr)
n
(Placename) a river in NW central Europe, rising in N France and flowing through SW Belgium to the North Sea: scene of battles in World War I. Length: 77 km (48 miles)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Y•ser

(iˈzɛər)

n.
a river flowing from N France through NW Belgium into the North Sea. 55 mi. (89 km) long.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After moving to Boesinghe on the Yser Canal the battalion marched forward into action south of Houthulst on 24th October.
Many of those who made it to the Yser Canal, behind the lines, their eyes streaming and their lungs burning, drowned as they tried to swim to safety.
In the London Gazette, on January 22, 1916, Meekosha's citation read: "Near the Yser Canal, France, 19 November 1915, Corporal Samuel Meekosha, 6th Bn, West Yorkshire Regiment.
In the London Gazette, on 22 January 1916, Meekosha's citation read: "Near the Yser Canal, France, 19 November 1915, Corporal Samuel Meekosha, 6th Bn, West Yorkshire Regiment.
At this battle, the 38th (Welsh) Division, flanked to its left by the Welsh Guards, crossed the Ypres/ Yser canal and took all its objectives, to include Pilkem Ridge, and this time earned praise from the Commander in Chief for the courage and determination shown in achieving its objectives.
It was the next day, May 3, that Sergeant-Major Cyril Allinson was delivering mail and he saw McCrae sitting at the back of an ambulance parked near the dressing station beside the Yser Canal, just a few hundred yards north of Ypres.
"To the south one could see very distinctly the Yser Canal bordered by trees already much damaged by the bombardment but which adequately masked the trenches established along the canal," he later wrote.
He rejoined the battalion in dugouts on the broad Yser Canal just before Christmas and early in 1917 the battalion took over trenches at Potijze.
Relieved on 27th September the battalion moved to the Potijze defences and the Yser Canal Bank to provide digging and carrying parties in very wet weather before returning to Poperinghe.