Yugoslavian


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Yu·go·sla·vi·a

 (yo͞o′gō-slä′vē-ə)
A former country of southeast Europe bordering on the Adriatic Sea. It was formed in 1918 as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes after the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and was renamed Yugoslavia in 1929. Under the leadership of Marshal Tito, the country became a Communist-led regime after World War II. After Tito's death in 1980, economic problems and ethnic tensions grew. Communist party control ended in 1990, and four of the six constituent republics (Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia) declared independence in 1991. Serbia and Montenegro, the remaining states, abandoned the name Yugoslavia in 2003 and dissolved the federation entirely in 2006.

Yu′go·slav′ , Yu′go·sla′vi·an adj. & n.

Yugoslavian

(ˌjuːɡəʊˈslɑːvɪən) or

Jugoslavian

adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to Yugoslavia or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to Yugoslavia or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Yugoslavia
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Yugoslavian - a native or inhabitant of YugoslaviaYugoslavian - a native or inhabitant of Yugoslavia
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Jugoslavija, Serbia and Montenegro, Union of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslavia - a mountainous republic in southeastern Europe bordering on the Adriatic Sea; formed from two of the six republics that made up Yugoslavia until 1992; Serbia and Montenegro were known as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 2003 when they adopted the name of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Adj.1.Yugoslavian - of or relating to or characteristic of the former country of Yugoslavia or its people or languages; "Yugoslavian wine"
Translations
jugoslovenski
jugoszlávjugoszláviai

Yugoslavian

[ˈjuːgəʊˈslɑːvɪən] ADJyugoeslavo, yugoslavo

Yugoslavian

[ˌjuːgəʊˈslɑːviən] adjyougoslave

Yugoslavian

adj (Hist) → jugoslawisch (Hist)

Yugoslavian

[ˌjuːgəʊˈslɑːvɪən] adj & njugoslavo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: Miroslav Krleza (7 July 1893-29 December 1981) was a leading Croatian writer and a prominent figure in cultural and literary life of the Yugoslavian states.
The accused was also found guilty of forging a Yugoslavian passport that he used to enter the UAE during the heist and then exited using the same travel document.
Both of these were crowd favourites and were followed in the 1980s by Yugoslavian Bosco Jankovic and Dutchman Heine Otto.
Another former Yugoslavian country separated from the Western Balkans and became part of the Euro-Atlantic community, reminds Slobodanka Jovanovska in Utrinski vesnik.
Curcic, 43, says: "You are invited to train and play with ex-Premiership top player nicknamed the Yugoslavian George Best - well known for his skills and techniques
The national team at various periods of time was trained by coaches who belonged to the Argentinian, Brazilian, Croatian, Czech, Egyptian, English, German, Tunisian, Yugoslavian and the Bahraini school.
The changes that appeared after the World War I constituted subjects for the analysis of the Romanian and Yugoslavian military experts and, in the period 1918 and 1919, there were no contacts between the two General Staffs because of the "Banat issue".
Organized Yugoslavian military resistance rapidly evaporated, and the government capitulated after only 11 days.
His purpose is to correct earlier historians' dichotomous perspective, especially the post WWII Yugoslavian communist track on collaboration and the view proffered by the exiled anti-communist emigres.
AFTER the shocking murder of two unarmed female police officers, we were told that hand grenades are now the "must have" weapon among villains - everything from British Army issued L109s to Yugoslavian M75s to homemade bombs.
Perisic, 67, the Yugoslavian army's highest-ranking officer, was found guilty of 12 of 13 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed including at Srebrenica, scene of Europe's worst wartime atrocity since World War II, and the shelling and sniping of the Bosnian Serb capital Sarajevo during its infamous siege from 1992-95.
Currently, the greatest milsurp bargains looking for new owners are the Model 24/47 and Model 48 Yugoslavian Mausers.