zaire

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Za·ire

 (zī′îr, zä-îr′)
See Congo.

Za·ir′e·an, Za·ir′i·an adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

zaire

(zɑːˈɪə)
n
1. (Currencies) the basic monetary unit used in Zaïre from 1967-1996 and equivalent to 100 makuta
2. (Historical Terms) the basic monetary unit used in Zaïre from 1967-1996 and equivalent to 100 makuta

Zaïre

(zɑːˈɪə)
n
1. (Placename) the former name (1971–97) of the Democratic Republic of Congo
2. (Placename) (formerly) the Zaïrian name (1971–97) for the (River) Congo3
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

za•ire

(zɑˈɪər, ˈzɑ ɪər)

n., pl. za•ire.
the basic monetary unit of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Za•ire

or Za•ïre

(zɑˈɪər, ˈzɑ ɪər)

n.
1. a former name of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
2. official name within the Democratic Republic of the Congo of the Congo River.
Za•ir′i•an, Za•ir′e•an, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zaire - the basic unit of money in Zairezaire - the basic unit of money in Zaire  
Zairese monetary unit - monetary unit in Zaire
likuta - 100 makuta equal 1 zaire in Zaire
2.zaire - a republic in central AfricaZaire - a republic in central Africa; achieved independence from Belgium in 1960
Goma - a city in eastern Congo at the northern end of Lake Kivu near the border with Rwanda
Kananga, Luluabourg - a city in southwestern Congo; former name (until 1966) was Luluabourg
Kinshasa, Leopoldville - the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the Congo river opposite Brazzaville
Elisabethville, Lubumbashi - a city in southeastern Congo near the border with Zambia; a copper mining center; former name (until 1966) was Elisabethville
Nyamuragira - an active volcano in eastern Congo
Nyiragongo - an active volcano in eastern Congo
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
Congo River, Zaire River, Congo - a major African river (one of the world's longest); flows through Congo into the South Atlantic
Kasai, Kasai River, River Kasai - a river of southwestern Africa that rises in central Angola and flows east and then north (forming part of the border between Angola and Congo) and continuing northwest through Congo to empty into the Congo River on the border between Congo and Republic of the Congo
Kivu, Lake Kivu - a lake in the mountains of central Africa between Congo and Rwanda
Lake Edward - a lake in the Great Rift Valley between Congo and Uganda
Chiluba, Luba - a member of a Bantu people in southeastern Congo
Congolese - a native or inhabitant of the Republic of the Congo
Zairean, Zairese - a native or inhabitant of Zaire
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Zaire
Zair
ザイール

Zaire

[zɑːˈiːəʳ] NZaire m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Zaïre

[zɑːˈɪər] nZaïre m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Zaire

n (Hist) → Zaire nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Zaire

[zɑːˈiːəʳ] nlo Zaire m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
From the early 1970s until the late 1980s, tens of thousands of Zaireans were involved in organising l'animation politique et culturelle--a programme of state-sponsored song and dance that drew on Congolese folklore and dominated the cultural consciousness of Zaireans.
They address the debate around the number of these individuals, seen as "illegal" immigrants, in South Africa, in which numbers have been inflated to reinforce xenophobia; the experiences of Nigerians, Congolese, and Zaireans and why they went to South Africa, their economic contributions, and issues they face; their relationships with the local black population, with an emphasis on language problems and stereotyping; and the migration of
Diasporic dispersals, too, are what characterise contemporary South Africa in Breytenbach's narrative: in Cape Town, he observes "how much the coloured population of Mother City carry in them the fused memories of slavery, of displacement, of exile ..." (133); the inhabitants of the tin and cardboard shack settlements on the Cape Flats are "mostly migrants from the devastated Eastern Cape" (134); and parts of the central city have been taken over by Nigerians, Congolese and Zaireans. And immigration into South Africa is matched by emigration from the young democracy, as Breytenbach details:
Before long, the refugees were enjoying a higher standard of living than the Zaireans. Furthermore, a good amount of money was now being pumped into the refugee areas of Zaire to obtain the necessary humanitarian services, and Mobutu had no control over it.
For 200 years, these ethnic-Tutsis have lived and prospered in the region, but have become unpopular with Zaireans. The Hutu militias in the camps started stirring up resentments towards the Banyamulenge.
The most imaginative reporting and powerful writing of In the Footsteps comes out in the tragicomic passages describing the survival skills of ordinary Zaireans: the debrouillards who learn to get by on their wits through minor graft; the stylish sapeurs who affirm themselves by spending money on fashionable luxuries rather than dreary necessities; the ferocious cripples with hand-pedaled tricycles who dominate commercial trade on the ferry between Kinshasa and Brazzaville; and "the man who stood in the middle of Avenue Colonel Lukusa day after day, gesturing melodramatically at the hole in the road he had filled with sand for the benefit of passing cars and demanding, in increasingly outraged tones, to be paid for his efforts."
Adept at intimidation, manipulation, coercion and outright bribery, Mobutu was able to entrench his rule over a population of 40m Zaireans with a seemingly supernatural ability
Kolingba is supported by several hundred Zaireans, ex-members of Mobutu's Division Speciale Presidentielle (DSP), and may be negotiating for further assistance from mercenaries.
In Sweden, attempts to return thousands of Kosovo Albanians to former Yugoslavia have been condemned by the Swedish Red Cross after a group of returnees were maltreated at the Bulgarian border by Serbian police, while the UN Committee Against Torture condemned Swiss refoulement policies (i.e., return of asylum-seekers), particularly involving Zaireans and Sri Lankans.
Concurrently, 250,000 long-displaced Tutsis within Zaire were being forced off their land, both by Zaireans and by the recently arrived, well-armed Hutus.
Its shacks lie empty save for occasional local Zaireans picking over what remains.
Five years after massive public protests forced President Mobutu Sese Seko to agree to free elections, Zaireans are still mired in an indefinite transition to democracy amid what a Reuters dispatch termed an "apparently terminal economic decline."