Zamenhof


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Zamenhof

(Polish ˈzamɛnxɔf)
n
(Biography) Lazarus Ludwig (laˈzarus ˈludvik). 1859–1917, Polish oculist; invented Esperanto
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References in periodicals archive ?
It had its days of glory between the wars but never fulfilled Zamenhof 's hopes.
Zamenhof, a doctor living in Poland, published a book detailing the structure and vocabulary of a wholly new language to which he did not give a name.
Each word embodies the aim of Zamenhof, who founded Esperanto in 1887 to transcend national boundaries and unite the world.
A bust of the creator of Esperanto, Ludwig Zamenhof, can be seen in the German town of Herzberg.
1917: Dr Lazarus Ludwig Zamenhof, Polish physician who invented the international language Esperanto, died.
1917: Dr Lazarus Ludwig Zamenhof, the Polish physician who invented the international language Esperanto, died.
This old joke plays on the fact that so many of Esperanto's early champions were, like its inventor, Ludwik Leyzer Zamenhof, Eastern European Jews.
Meyer Landsman lives in the Hotel Zamenhof, a dilapidated residence named after the creator of Esperanto, an early symbol of the failed utopianism that will see Jewish Sitka being reclaimed by the American government.
Zamenhof planned it as an amalgam of various languages and published it in a book, the Unua Libro, in 1887.
Melvin Jules Bukiet brings us Franz Kafka as an impressionable boy in "The Two Franzes"; Joseph Skibell tracks down Ludwig Zamenhof, inventor of Esperanto, in a central European resort (excerpt from An Incurable Romantic); Dara Horn imagines Marc Chagall as an art teacher near Moscow, goading his students to paint with conviction (excerpt from The World to Come); Joseph Epstein gives us a biting, thinly-disguised portrait of Saul Bellow in "My Brother, Eli"; and Jonathan Rosen gives us the actual Saul Bellow, though we meet him in the afterlife, located just beyond Ellis Island, in "The True World".
Zamenhof, had seen in his childhood that in his city people spoke Russian, Polish, German, and Hebrew, and each thought of the other groups disparagingly.