Zamyatin


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Zamyatin

(Russian zaˈmjatjin)
n
(Biography) Yevgenii Ivanovich (jɪvˈɡjenij ɪˈvanəvitʃ). 1884–1937, Russian novelist and writer, in Paris from 1931, whose works include satirical studies of provincial life in Russia and England, where he worked during World War I, and the dystopian novel We (1924)
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But both of these visionaries are indebted to a relatively little-known novel entitled We by all-but-forgotten Soviet novelist Yevgeny Zamyatin.
Yevgeny Zamyatin's We, Jack London's Iron Heel and Katherine
The great Russian dystopian writer Zamyatin lodged in Jesmond in 1915/16 and was so impressed with its stultifying uniformity that he named and located the mythical country of his satire of the English bourgeois, Jesmond.
White, 'Mathematical imagery in Musil's Young Torless and Zamyatin's We', Comparative Literature, xviii (1966), 71-8.
Among these are The Iron Heel (1907) by Jack London, My (1924; We) by Yevgeny Zamyatin, Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley, and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949) by George Orwell.
Between 1920 and 1950, the anti-utopian novels of Zamyatin [78], Kafka, Huxley [21], and Orwell [45] unleashed a visionary, yet paranoiac "literature of alarm" (see, e.g., [5], [12], [15], [19], [32], [36], [49], [53], and [62]).
After the revolution, Zamyatin helped organize the writers ' group known as the Serapion Brothers and became a leader and teacher of the circle's young writers.
Some of the highlights in Fokkema's include analyses of Emile Souvestre's dystopian 1846 Le Monde tel qu'il sera (a narrative about the importance of Rousseau's work in utopian fiction), Dostoyevsky as dystopian writer and the significance of the parable of the Grand Inquisitor in The Brothers Karamazov, Yevgeni Zamyatin's dystopian We and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, and H.G.
Figures from real life will also be woven into the North East storyline with Carolyn Pickles playing Councillor Maud Burnett, who campaigned for more women to be involved in the local workforce; and Simon Scardifield cast as Yevgeny Zamyatin, the Russian engineer who spent time in Newcastle during the war and went on to write the novel We - an inspiration for George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.
Drawing on disparate examples such as Yevgeny Zamyatin's We (1924) and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale (1985), Parrinder suggests that utopian narratives which claim historical believability frequently utilize the image of a perpetually mobilized population to illustrate the dystopic nature of such a fantasy.
(1) See for instance Brett Cooke's work on dystopia and Zamyatin's We and Michael Drout's work on adaptive landscapes and the evolution of the Anglo-Saxon "wisdom tradition."