Zanzibari


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Zanzibari

(ˌzænzɪˈbɑːrɪ)
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to Zanzibar or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to Zanzibar or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Zanzibar
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sleep in one of the traditional Zanzibari bungalows set among flowers and built away from the restaurant so that guests can enjoy the tranquillity of the surroundings.
(14) Conrad uses other words at other times, ranging from "enemy," "savage," and "cannibal" to such neutral terms as the ethnic description "Zanzibari" and the politically correct racial designation of the time, "Negro." It is interesting (and I think profitable) to study the use that he makes of each word.
The Zanzibari Government's liberal investment policies have hastened this rapid development, and today tourism is the second largest money-earner in Zanzibar after agriculture, bringing in more than US$2.4 million in revenue in 1998 alone.
Arab, Indian, African, Persian, British, Portuguese and East German influences can be seen in Zanzibari buildings, ranging in style from exotic - some combine colonial columns with Indian carvings and Omani arches - to ugly East German-designed housing estates from the late 1960s.
By the 1880s, patrician power in the trading towns of the Swahili coast was being challenged by the increasing volatility of this commercialized world - by the Swahili patricians' need to fend off Zanzibari intrusions, by the growing numbers of people from the African interior living in the towns, by the diversity of demands being made by clients and allies.
Yahya bin Badr Al Ma'awali, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Social Development also received the Zanzibari Minister separately.
She was thus following in the footsteps of the other eminent crooner queens of the times, like the Egyptian Kulsum and our own taarab legend, Zanzibari Siti Binti Saad.
Ally Saleh, a member of the opposition party of Tanzania's parliament usually spends his days on the mainland, representing his Zanzibari constituents.
Manipulated by malicious beings, spirits are also thought to harm people, as in Kjersti Larsen's sad tale of a Zanzibari woman's recourse to explanations of invisible powers after a real-estate swindle.
The tables are stacked with parcels of Zanzibari biryani and pilau, mandazi bread, samosa and kachori, ready to be picked up by people who have placed orders.
After the visit, the Zanzibari guest expressed his delight to visit the SAF Museum and view the Sultanate's ancient military heritage and landmarks of progress and development.