Zeeman effect


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Related to Zeeman effect: Stark effect, Anomalous zeeman effect

Zeeman effect

n.
The splitting of single spectral lines of an emission spectrum into three or more polarized components when the radiation source is in a magnetic field.

[After Pieter Zeeman.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Zeeman effect

(ˈziːmən)
n
(General Physics) the splitting of a spectral line of a substance into several closely spaced lines when the substance is placed in a magnetic field
[C20: named after Pieter Zeeman (1865–1943), Dutch physicist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
The gyromagnetic ratio of the electron can be observed experimentally by applying external magnetic fields (for example, as seen in the "Zeeman effect" or in the "Stern-Gerlach experiment"):
Lembke, "Valley Zeeman effect in elementary optical excitations of monolayer W[Se.sub.2]," Nature Physics, pp.
Table 2: AAS instrumental parameters for determination of Ni Operating conditions Primary source Nickel Hollow Cathode lamp (Agilent Technologies) Lamp current 5 mA Analytical wavelength 232 nm Background correction system Zeeman effect based (Transversal) Slit width 0.2 nm Mode Absorbance (peak height) Graphite furnace operation Atomization tube Partition tubes (coated)-GTA (Agilent Technologies) Sheath/Purge gas Argon (Ar) of 99.999% purity Sample Injection 30 (sample, [micro]L) Table 3: Temperature program of the AAS method for determination of nickel.
The optical pumped magnetometer is one kind of them, which is based on the Zeeman Effect. Since the temperature does not affect the atomic energy level, there is almost no temperature drift problem in the optical pumped magnetometer.
The background absorption was automatically corrected by the Zeeman Effect. One thousand micrograms per milliliter standard solution of each mineral was used in the measurements (Puls, 1994).
Van Vleck, "Theory of the microwave Zeeman effect in atomic oxygen," Physical Review, vol.
The website now has more than 5,000 fact-packed pages, covering topics from the Ackermann Curve to the Zeeman Effect (the splitting of spectral lines when an external magnetic field is applied).