Zen

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Zen

 (zĕn)
n.
1. A school of Mahayana Buddhism that asserts that enlightenment can be attained through meditation, self-contemplation, and intuition rather than through faith and devotion and that is practiced mainly in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Also called Zen Buddhism.
2. also zen An approach to an activity, skill, or subject that emphasizes simplicity and intuition rather than conventional thinking or fixation on goals: the zen of cooking.

[Japanese zen, from Early Middle Chinese dʑian, meditation; also the source of Mandarin chán), from Pali jhānaṃ, from Sanskrit dhyānam, from dhyāti, he meditates.]
Word History: Zen, a word that evokes the most characteristic and appealing aspects of Japanese culture for many English speakers, is ultimately of Indo-European origin. The Japanese word zen is a borrowing of a medieval Chinese word (now pronounced chán, in modern Mandarin Chinese) meaning "meditation, contemplation." Chán is one of the many Buddhist terms in Chinese that originate in India, the homeland of Buddhism. A monk named Bodhidharma, said to be of Indian origin, introduced Buddhist traditions emphasizing the practice of meditation to China in the 5th century and established Chan Buddhism. From the 7th century onward, elements of Chan Buddhism began to reach Japan, where chán came to be pronounced zen. The Chinese word chán is a shortening of chán'nǎ "meditation, contemplation" a borrowing of the Sanskrit term dhyānam. The Sanskrit word is derived from the Sanskrit root dhyā-, dhī-, "to see, observe," and the Indo-European root behind the Sanskrit is *dheiə-, *dhyā-, "to see, look at." This root also shows up in Greek, where *dhyā- developed into sā-, as in the Common Greek noun *sāma, "sign, distinguishing mark." This noun became sēma in Attic Greek and is the source of English semantic.

Zen

(zɛn) Buddhism
n
1. (Buddhism) a Japanese school, of 12th-century Chinese origin, teaching that contemplation of one's essential nature to the exclusion of all else is the only way of achieving pure enlightenment
2. (Buddhism) (modifier) of or relating to this school: Zen Buddhism.
[from Japanese, from Chinese ch'an religious meditation, from Pali jhāna, from Sanskrit dhyāna]
ˈZenic adj
ˈZenist n

Zen

(zɛn)

n.
1. a Mahayana movement of Buddhism, introduced into China in the 6th century a.d. and into Japan in the 12th century, that emphasizes enlightenment by means of meditation and direct, intuitive insights.
2. the discipline and practice of this sect.
[1725–35; < Japanese]
Zen′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Zen - school of Mahayana Buddhism asserting that enlightenment can come through meditation and intuition rather than faith; China and Japan
Buddhism - a religion represented by the many groups (especially in Asia) that profess various forms of the Buddhist doctrine and that venerate Buddha
Zen Buddhist - an adherent of the doctrines of Zen Buddhism
2.Zen - a Buddhist doctrine that enlightenment can be attained through direct intuitive insight
satori - (Zen Buddhism) a state of sudden spiritual enlightenment
Buddhism - the teaching of Buddha that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct and wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth
3.zen - street name for lysergic acid diethylamideZen - street name for lysergic acid diethylamide
LSD, lysergic acid diethylamide - a powerful hallucinogenic drug manufactured from lysergic acid
Translations
zenzenbuddhalaisuus
thiền

Zen

[zen]
A. NZen m
B. CPD Zen Buddhism Nbudismo m Zen
Zen Buddhist Nbudista mf Zen

Zen

[ˈzɛn] nzen m

Zen

nZen nt; Zen BuddhismZen-Buddhismus m

Zen

[zɛn] nZen m inv

zen

adj & n zen m
References in periodicals archive ?
Last year in Japan, a Zen monk in an ancient Buddhist temple at Mount Koya made news for his virulent (and viral) responses to tourist reviews on Booking.com of the World Heritage site where he resides.
Another take-action guide designed to bring about fundamental change is Shunmyo Masuno's The Art of Simple Living: 100 Daily Practices From a Japanese Zen Monk for a Lifetime of Calm and Joy
In March 2004 Tracy Franz began a journal to document a period of separation from her husband, a Zen monk spending a year at a six-hundred-year-old Buddhist monastery in Japan.
Among his many scholarly writings, Frank co-translated "Diary of A Korean Zen Monk with Jong Kweon Yi" and "Grateful Offerings: Korean Mountain Temple Cooking with his wife Jinsuk." The latter work is a beautifully illustrated guide to Korean temple cuisine featuring delicious vegan recipes and Buddhist wisdom.
He was raised a Jew but explored Christianity, and became a Buddhist Zen monk for a time.
She did not spend thirty years as a Zen monk, but like Philip, she pursued truth--dharma--with remarkable persistence.
She writes, "While the projection of his warrior Zen monk identity appeals to audiences taken in by the hipness of such hybridization, the appropriation and adaptation of the past into the present or, to put it differently, the other into the here, also freezes images of Asia, Asians, and Asian Americans into a reified construction of otherness" (73).
Sitting on a simple rustic bench that could have been designed by the Zen monk and tea master, Sen no Rikyu, we both look back to the yatsuhashi.
Millbury VFW will hold a talk by author Claude AnShin Thomas, Vietnam Veteran and Buddhist Zen monk, 7 to 9 p.m.
How much better must the attitude of the Zen monk be!" Repeatedly in the text we see references to the virtuous behavior of lay people and Dogen's subsequent comment to the effect that "if even lay persons have this attitude, how much more so should a monk" (SZ 2.3).
Zen monk and bestselling author Brad Warner offers insights into why the "Godless religion" of Zen Buddhism has much to say about God, and stems from the author's travels around the world speaking to people about the Zen experience.
It's ironic that people resist schedules because they want to be spontaneous and savour the moment, given that your average Zen monk -- whose whole job, to simplify somewhat, is to savour the moment -- abides by a rigorous schedule.