Zenger Case

Zenger Case

1735 A New York libel action which established freedom of the Press.
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References in periodicals archive ?
side--the Zenger case. (6) The Zenger case is usually understood as one
In a critical colonial test of jury independence, Andrew Hamilton for the defense seeded a community values view of the jury in the New York Supreme Court in the 1735 Zenger case, establishing that the jury was, first, to try the case as neighbors: "The law supposes you to be summoned out of the neighborhood where the fact is alleged to be committed; and the reason of your being taken out of the neighborhood is because you are supposed to have the best knowledge of the fact that is to be tried" (Alexander 1963, 75).
While I will most likely continue to teach the Zenger Case as a landmark step towards press freedom, Nord's interpretation can certainly be woven into the more standard interpretation, as it probably should be.
"Iraq's equivalent of the Zenger case is being conducted now before an Iraqi investigating judge," Horton writes.
In addition to the Zenger case, numerous attempts by colonial governors to control the courts, often by limiting jury trials, were consistently rebuffed in the middle of the eighteenth century.
The overwhelming evidence of judicial bias in the Zenger case stands in stark contrast to the erroneous but apparently good-faith denial of first-choice counsel in Gonzalez-Lopez.
"I think the Zenger case illustrates that if the government, or some part of it, tramples on the rights of the people, it is the lawyers who have the independence and courage and resourcefulness to resist."
McManus' review of Quest of a Hemisphere ("Quest for True American History," October 21st issue), there is an error regarding the John Peter Zenger case of 1735.
366-376), pointing out that the most famous libel trial in colonial America, the Zenger case, had "no importance as a legal precedent" (p.
Two of the contributions focus directly on the Zenger case. Ellen Moses James draws on the work of Stanley Fish and others in a thoughtful study of Andrew Hamilton's appeal to the jury.