Zimbabwe


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Zimbabwe

Zim·bab·we

 (zĭm-bäb′wē, -wā)
1. A country of southern Africa. Various Bantu peoples migrated into the area during the first millennium, displacing the earlier San inhabitants. European colonization began in 1889 under the British South Africa Company founded by Cecil Rhodes, and in 1923 it became the self-governing British colony of Southern Rhodesia (often just Rhodesia), which formed part of the colonial federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland from 1953 to 1963. Rhodesia declared itself independent in 1965, although independence was not formally granted by Great Britain until 1980. Harare is the capital and the largest city.
2. also Great Zimbabwe A ruined city of southeast Zimbabwe south of Harare. First occupied by Iron Age peoples in the fourth century ad, it contains extensive remains of walls and towers dating from the 11th to 15th centuries.

Zim·bab′we·an adj. & n.

Zimbabwe

(zɪmˈbɑːbwɪ; -weɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a country in SE Africa, formerly a self-governing British colony founded in 1890 by the British South Africa Company, which administered the country until a self-governing colony was established in 1923; joined with Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) and Nyasaland (now Malawi) as the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland from 1953 to 1963; made a unilateral declaration of independence (UDI) under the leadership of Ian Smith in 1965 on the basis of White minority rule; proclaimed a republic in 1970; in 1976 the principle of Black majority rule was accepted and in 1978 a transitional government was set up; gained independence under Robert Mugabe in 1980; effectively a one-party state since 1987; a member of the Commonwealth until 2003, when it withdrew as a result of conflict with other members. Official language: English. Religion: Christian majority. Currency: Zimbabwe dollar. Capital: Harare. Pop: 13 182 908 (2013 est). Area: 390 624 sq km (150 820 sq miles). Former names: Southern Rhodesia (until 1964) or Rhodesia (1964–79)
2. (Archaeology) Also: Great Zimbabwe a ruined fortified settlement in Zimbabwe, which at its height, in the 15th century, was probably the capital of an empire covering SE Africa
3. (Placename) Also: Great Zimbabwe a ruined fortified settlement in Zimbabwe, which at its height, in the 15th century, was probably the capital of an empire covering SE Africa

Zim•bab•we

(zɪmˈbɑb weɪ, -wi)

n.
1. Formerly, (until 1964) Southern Rhodesia, (1964–80) Rhodesia. a republic in S Africa: a former British colony; unilaterally declared independence in 1965; gained independence in 1980. 11,423,175; 150,873 sq. mi. (390,759 sq. km).Cap.: Harare.
Zim•bab′we•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Zimbabwe - a landlocked republic in south central Africa formerly called RhodesiaZimbabwe - a landlocked republic in south central Africa formerly called Rhodesia; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1980
capital of Zimbabwe, Harare, Salisbury - the capital and largest city of Zimbabwe
Bulawayo - industrial city in southwestern Zimbabwe
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
Victoria Falls, Victoria - a waterfall in the Zambezi River on the border between Zimbabwe and Zambia; diminishes seasonally
Zambezi, Zambezi River - an African river; flows into the Indian Ocean
Cewa, Chewa, Chichewa - a member of the Bantu-speaking people of Malawi and eastern Zambia and northern Zimbabwe
Zimbabwean - a native or inhabitant of Zimbabwe
Translations
Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
Zimbabve
ジンバブウェジンバブエ
짐바브웨
Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
ประเทศซิมบับเว
nước Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

[zɪmˈbɑːbwɪ] NZimbabue m

Zimbabwe

[zɪmˈbɑːbweɪ zɪmˈbɑːbwi] nZimbabwe m
in Zimbabwe → au Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

nSimbabwe nt, → Zimbabwe nt

Zimbabwe

[zɪmˈbɑːbwɪ] nlo Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

زِيـمْبابَوْي Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Simbabwe Ζιμπάμπουε Zimbabue Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Zimbabve Zimbabwe ジンバブウェ 짐바브웨 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Zimbabué, Zimbábue Зимбабве Zimbabwe ประเทศซิมบับเว Zimbabwe nước Zimbabwe 津巴布韦
References in periodicals archive ?
Commenting on the tour of Zimbabwe, Ongo'ndo said: "Dhiren Gondaria who opened batting for us in the second Twenty20 game in which we beat Zimbabwe by seven wickets appears to have gained confidence, which is good for us.
Participants were informed that there was a significant drop in the import of new light duty vehicles in Zimbabwe - from 15.
What has happened in Zimbabwe is not a people's revolution in the traditional sense.
Lovemore Banda gave credit to the current setup in the Zimbabwe Cricket.
Following a state visit to Zimbabwe by Chinese President Xi Jinping, the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ) announced that it would make the yuan an official currency as part of a deal that included China's cancellation of Zimbabwe's $40 million debt.
Despite strained political relations, the United States is a leading provider of humanitarian assistance to the people of Zimbabwe.
Egoli), South Africa wherein he told the audience that British Prime Minister Tony Blair could keep his England a let Mugabe keep his Zimbabwe and that economically, Zimbabwe is still an occupied country, 22 years after Independence, however, the government has decided to do the only right and just thing by taking back land and giving it to its rightful indigenous, Black owners who lost it in circumstances of colonial pillage.
Veteran Test batsman Younus Khan and off-spinner Saeed Ajmal were also excluded from the Zimbabwe tour.
Sources said PM Nawaz Sharif through a letter expressed his gratitude to president of Zimbabwe for sending cricket team to Pakistan.
During the talks it was felt that there was a need to revive Zimbabwe's manufacturing sector and this could be achieved through greater value addition of natural resources for Zimbabwe to increase the value of its exports.
Zimbabwe Squad: Brendan Taylor (captain), Tendai Chatara, Elton Chigumbura, Michael Chinouya, Graeme Cremer, Kyle Jarvis, Timycen Maruma, Hamilton Masakadza, Natsai M'shangwe, Tinotenda Mutombodzi, Vusi Sibanda, Sikandar Raza, Prosper Utseya, Brian Vitoris, Malcolm Wallers, Sean Williams
Unfortunately, by the late 1990s when ZANU-PF had been in power for approaching 20 years things had started to go very wrong and Zimbabwe began a steady decline.

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