Zinzendorf


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Zin·zen·dorf

 (zĭn′zən-dôrf′, tsĭn′tsən-), Count Nikolaus Ludwig von 1700-1760.
German theologian who founded the Moravian Church (1722).

Zinzendorf

(German ˈtsɪntsəndɔrf)
n
(Biography) Count Nikolaus Ludwig von (ˈniːkolaus ˈluːtvɪç fɔn). 1700–60, German religious reformer, who organized the Moravian Church
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Noun1.Zinzendorf - German theologian (1700-1760)
References in periodicals archive ?
(5.) Yao K, N'guessan KF, Zinzendorf NY, Kouassi KA, Kouassi KC, Loukou YG, et al.
An Ecumenical Theology of the Heart: The Theology of Count Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf, by Arthur J.
(15.) Joseph Th[eodor] Muller, Hymnologisches Handbuch zum Gesangbuch der Brudergemeine (Herrnhut: Verlag des Vereins fur Brudergeschichte, 1916), in Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf Materialen und Dokumente, Reihe 4, Band VI (Hildesheim, Germany and New York: Georg Olms Verlag, 1977).
(4) Perhaps rivalled in its antiquity only by the Waldensians, this old Protestant institution, founded in 1457, with roots in the reform efforts of Jan Hus of Prague, became a worldwide mission-oriented church after its renewal under Count Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf in Herrnhut, Saxony.
Through persons like John Wesley and Count Nikolaus von Zinzendorf, the pietistic impulse was introduced into the US, where it merged with the first Protestant Awakening under Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield.
Koenig was also greatly influenced by the life and work of Count Zinzendorf, the German religious and social reformer and bishop of the Moravian Church.
(104) Count Zinzendorf was one of the leaders of the Moravian Church; he extended its influence to England, the West Indies and North America.
(7.) Apart from Mozart's letters, the next best source about domestic music making in late-eighteenth-century Vienna is to be found in the diaries of Count Karl Zinzendorf (1739-1813).
It does not mention Nicolaus von Zinzendorf as the founding father of Protestant missions on six continents, but instead presents William Carey as "the Father of the Modem Missions Movement" (116).
For a Moravian leader, Nicolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf, communication and worship flavored with the language of Blood and Wounds theology helped to create communal bonds of shared meaning and religious experience that extended across linguistic boundaries.
Following a critical discussion of prominent approaches to pluralism such as those by John Hick, Gavin D'Costa, and George Lindbeck, Thompson draws on the works of Comenius and Zinzendorf in the Moravian tradition to identify relevant principles for the development of a Protestant theology of religious pluralism.