Zoroastrianism

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Related to Zoroastrians: Baha'i, Judaism, Parsis

Zo·ro·as·tri·an·ism

 (zôr′ō-ăs′trē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The religious system founded by Zoroaster and set forth in the Avesta, teaching the worship of Ahura Mazda in the context of a universal struggle between the forces of light and of darkness.

Zo′ro·as′tri·an adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Zoroastrianism

(ˌzɒrəʊˈæstrɪənˌɪzəm) or

Zoroastrism

n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) the dualistic religion founded by the Persian prophet Zoroaster in the late 7th or early 6th centuries bc and set forth in the sacred writings of the Zend-Avesta. It is based on the concept of a continuous struggle between Ormazd (or Ahura Mazda), the god of creation, light, and goodness, and his arch enemy, Ahriman, the spirit of evil and darkness, and it includes a highly developed ethical code. Also called: Mazdaism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Zo•ro•as•tri•an•ism

(ˌzɔr oʊˈæs tri əˌnɪz əm, ˌzoʊr-)

also Zo`ro•as′trism,



n.
an Iranian religion, founded c600 b.c. by Zoroaster, based on beliefs in a supreme deity, Ahura Mazda, and a cosmic struggle between a spirit of good and a spirit of evil.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Zoroastrianism

the doctrines and practices of a dualistic Iranian religion, especially the existence of a supreme deity, Ahura Mazda, and belief in a cosmic struggle between a spirit of good and light and a spirit of evil and darkness. Also called Zoroastrism, Zarathustrism, Mazdaism. — Zoroastrian, n., adj.
See also: Religion
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Zoroastrianism - system of religion founded in Persia in the 6th century BC by ZoroasterZoroastrianism - system of religion founded in Persia in the 6th century BC by Zoroaster; set forth in the Zend-Avesta; based on concept of struggle between light (good) and dark (evil)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
Parseeism, Parsiism - the faith of a Zoroastrian sect in India
Ahura - (Zoroastrianism) title for benevolent deities
Avestan - of or pertaining to the Avesta (sacred text of Zoroastrianism)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Zoroastrianism

[ˌzɒrəʊˈæstrɪənˌɪzəm] Nzoroastrismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The day is dedicated to the beginning of the spring and renewal of Nature and it is celebrated on the first day of the first month of the calendar followed by Zoroastrians.
"Muslims, Zoroastrians, Jews and all Iranians of any ethnic, religious or cultural background are rooted in the country's soil and make efforts for their country's prosperity and progress," the Zoroastrian priest said at a ceremony of commemoration of Imam Khomeini.
The Zoroastrians and Jews each elect one representative in the parliament, Assyrian and Chaldean Christians jointly elect one representative, and Armenian Christians in the north and the south are each represented by one lawmaker.
The High Commissioner said Pakistan is rich in cultural and religious diversity as its population comprises the Christians, Sikhs, Budhists, Hindus, Parsis, Zoroastrians, Bahais, and small portion of the Kalash, Kihals and Jains.
During the height of the Sassanian Empire, incantation bowls were used by Christians, Zoroastrians, and primarily Jews as a means of protective magic against infernal powers.
The only "correct" calendar of the Zoroastrians is the Fasli calendar, where the New Year's Day falls every year on the 21st of March.
The relationship between Arabs, Muslims, Persians, and Zoroastrians in actuality was.
Following the papal Assisi model of praying in each other's presence, the service consists of Benedictine monks of the abbey, and prayer form the religious traditions of Buddhist Zen, Hindus, Sikhs, Muslims, Jews, Zoroastrians, Theosophists, Bahai, and Protestants.
During the Islamic invasion in the 7th century, many Zoroastrians migrated to India looking for a new land to call their home, and they landed in the Western coast, in the state of Gujarat.
Currently there is one voters' list that includes all religious groups, including Muslims, Hindus, Christians, Zoroastrians and Sikhs, whereas in the case of Ahmadis, a separate voters list is being prepared.
And while we're at it, let's hear it for the Muslims, Buddhists, Wiccans, and Zoroastrians, too.