Zug


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Zug

(German tsuːk)
n
1. (Placename) a canton of N central Switzerland: the smallest Swiss canton; mainly German-speaking and Roman Catholic; joined the Swiss Confederation in 1352. Capital: Zug. Pop: 102 200 (2002 est). Area: 239 sq km (92 sq miles)
2. (Placename) a town in N central Switzerland, the capital of Zug canton, on Lake Zug. Pop: 22 973 (2000)
3. (Placename) Lake Zug a lake in N central Switzerland, in Zug and Schwyz cantons. Area: 39 sq km (15 sq miles)
French name: Zoug

Zug

(tsuk)

n.
1. a canton in N central Switzerland. 92,392. 92 sq. mi. (238 sq. km).
2. the capital of this canton, on the Lake of Zug. 22,200.
3. Lake of, a lake in N central Switzerland. 15 sq. mi. (39 sq. km).
References in classic literature ?
SCHLAG, for example; and ZUG. There are three-quarters of a column of SCHLAGS in the dictonary, and a column and a half of ZUGS.
Just the same with ZUG. Strictly speaking, ZUG means Pull, Tug, Draught, Procession, March, Progress, Flight, Direction, Expedition, Train, Caravan, Passage, Stroke, Touch, Line, Flourish, Trait of Character, Feature, Lineament, Chess-move, Organ-stop, Team, Whiff, Bias, Drawer, Propensity, Inhalation, Disposition: but that thing which it does NOT mean--when all its legitimate pennants have been hung on, has not been discovered yet.
One cannot overestimate the usefulness of SCHLAG and ZUG. Armed just with these two, and the word ALSO, what cannot the foreigner on German soil accomplish?
Let him talk right along, fearlessly; let him pour his indifferent German forth, and when he lacks for a word, let him heave a SCHLAG into the vacuum; all the chances are that it fits it like a plug, but if it doesn't let him promptly heave a ZUG after it; the two together can hardly fail to bung the hole; but if, by a miracle, they SHOULD fail, let him simply say ALSO!
And eighthly, and last, I would retain ZUG and SCHLAG, with their pendants, and discard the rest of the vocabulary.
Heinz Tannler, Zug finance director, said that soon restrictions on cryptocurrency firms will be removed.
The canton of Zug, which is about 20 minutes by train from Zurich, shows how much administrators can do to set up a good environment for innovative firms.
In her new book, Buying a Bride, law professor Marcia Zug upends prevailing views of "mail-order" marriages as exploitative, instead finding that women traded oppressive conditions at home for liberating opportunities abroad.
"Despite significant risks, mail-order marriages are typically beneficial and even liberating for women," says Marcia Zug, expressing a sentiment she never thought she'd write.
Zug's mayor, Dolfi ME-ller, was surprised by the considerable media response.
Project Zug is run in partnership with Mechon Hadar, a nationally-acclaimed center for immersive Jewish learning in New York.