kick

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Related to a kick at the can: kick the can down the road

kick

 (kĭk)
v. kicked, kick·ing, kicks
v.intr.
1. To extend the leg away from the body; strike out with the foot or feet.
2. Sports
a. To score or gain ground by kicking a ball.
b. To punt in football.
c. To propel the body in swimming by moving the legs, as with a flutter kick or frog kick.
3. To recoil: The powerful rifle kicked upon being fired.
4. Informal
a. To express negative feelings vigorously; complain.
b. To oppose by argument; protest.
v.tr.
1. To strike with the foot: kicked the wall in frustration.
2. To propel by striking with the foot: kick a ball.
3. To spring back against suddenly: The rifle kicked my shoulder when I fired it.
4. Sports To score (a goal or point) by kicking a ball.
n.
1.
a. A vigorous blow with the foot.
b. Sports The motion of the legs that propels the body in swimming.
2. Any of various moves in dance in which the leg is extended from the body.
3. A jolting recoil: a rifle with a heavy kick.
4. Slang A complaint; a protest.
5. Slang Power; force: a car engine with a lot of kick.
6. Slang
a. A feeling of pleasurable stimulation: got a kick out of the show.
b. kicks Fun: went bowling just for kicks.
7. Slang Temporary, often obsessive interest: I'm on a science fiction kick.
8. Slang A sudden, striking surprise; a twist.
9. kicks Slang Shoes.
10. Sports
a. The act or an instance of kicking a ball.
b. A kicked ball.
c. The distance spanned by a kicked ball.
Phrasal Verbs:
kick about Informal
To move from place to place.
kick around Informal
1. To treat badly; abuse.
2. To move from place to place: "spent the next three years in Italy, kicking around the country on a motor scooter" (Charles E. Claffey).
3. To give thought or consideration to; ponder or discuss.
kick back
1. To recoil unexpectedly and violently.
2. Informal To take it easy; relax: kicked back at home and watched TV.
3. Slang To return (stolen items).
4. Slang To pay a kickback.
kick in
1. Informal To contribute (one's share): kicked in a few dollars for the office party.
2. Informal To become operative or take effect: "His pituitary kicked in, and his growth was suddenly vertical" (Kenneth Browser).
3. Slang To die.
kick off
1. Sports To begin or resume play with a kickoff.
2. Informal To begin; start: kicked off the promotional tour with a press conference.
3. Slang To die.
kick out Slang
To throw out; dismiss.
kick over
To begin to fire: The engine finally kicked over.
kick up Informal
1. To increase in amount or force; intensify: A sandstorm kicked up while we drove through the desert.
2. To stir up (trouble): kicked up a row.
3. To show signs of disorder: His ulcer has kicked up again.
Idioms:
kick ass/butt Vulgar Slang
To take forceful or harsh measures to achieve an objective.
kick the bucket Slang
To die.
kick the habit Slang
To free oneself of an addiction, as to narcotics or cigarettes.
kick up (one's) heels Informal
To cast off one's inhibitions and have a good time.
kick upstairs Slang
To promote to a higher yet less desirable position.

[Middle English kiken, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

kick

(kɪk)
vb
1. (tr) to drive or impel with the foot
2. (tr) to hit with the foot or feet
3. (intr) to strike out or thrash about with the feet, as in fighting or swimming
4. (intr) to raise a leg high, as in dancing
5. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (of a gun, etc) to recoil or strike in recoiling when fired
6. (Rugby) (tr) rugby
a. to make (a conversion or a drop goal) by means of a kick
b. to score (a goal) by means of a kicked conversion
7. (Soccer) (tr) soccer to score (a goal) by a kick
8. (Athletics (Track & Field)) (intr) athletics to put on a sudden spurt
9. (intr) to make a sudden violent movement
10. (Cricket) (intr) cricket (of a ball) to rear up sharply
11. informal (sometimes foll by: against) to object or resist
12. (intr) informal to be active and in good health (esp in the phrase alive and kicking)
13. informal to change gear in (a car, esp a racing car): he kicked into third and passed the bigger car.
14. (tr) informal to free oneself of (an addiction, etc): to kick heroin; to kick the habit.
15. kick against the pricks See prick20
16. (Soccer) rugby soccer to kick the ball out of the playing area and into touch. See touch15
17. (Rugby) rugby soccer to kick the ball out of the playing area and into touch. See touch15
18. informal to take some temporizing action so that a problem is shelved or a decision postponed
19. kick one's heels to wait or be kept waiting
20. kick over the traces See trace23
21. kick the bucket slang to die
22. kick up one's heels informal to enjoy oneself without inhibition
n
23. a thrust or blow with the foot
24. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) any of certain rhythmic leg movements used in swimming
25. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) the recoil of a gun or other firearm
26. informal a stimulating or exciting quality or effect (esp in the phrases get a kick out of or for kicks)
27. (Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics a sudden spurt, acceleration, or boost
28. a sudden violent movement
29. informal the sudden stimulating or intoxicating effect of strong alcoholic drink or certain drugs
30. informal power or force
31. slang a temporary enthusiasm: he's on a new kick every week.
32. kick in the pants slang
a. a reprimand or scolding designed to produce greater effort, enthusiasm, etc, in the person receiving it
b. a setback or disappointment
33. kick in the teeth slang a humiliating rebuff
[C14 kiken, perhaps of Scandinavian origin]
ˈkickable adj

kick

(kɪk)
v.t.
1. to strike with the foot or feet: to kick a ball.
2. to drive, force, thrust, etc., by or as if by kicks.
3. Football. to score (a field goal or a conversion) by place-kicking the ball.
4. Informal. to make (a car) increase in speed, esp. in auto racing.
5. Slang. to give up or break (a drug addiction): He kicked the habit.
v.i.
6. to make a rapid, forceful thrust with the foot, feet, leg, or legs; strike with the feet or legs: to kick at a ball.
7. to resist, object, or complain.
8. to recoil, as a firearm when fired.
9. to be actively or vigorously involved: alive and kicking.
10. kick around orabout,
a. to treat harshly.
b. to speculate about; discuss.
c. to move frequently from place to place; roam; wander.
d. to linger or remain for a long interval without being used, noticed, or resolved.
11. kick back,
a. to recoil, esp. vigorously or unexpectedly.
b. to give someone a kickback.
c. to relax.
12. kick in,
a. to contribute one's share, esp. in money.
b. to go into effect; become operational.
13. kick off,
a. Football. to begin or resume play by a kickoff.
b. Slang. to die.
c. to initiate (an undertaking).
14. kick on, to switch on; turn on.
15. kick out, to eject; get rid of.
16. kick over, (of an internal-combustion engine) to begin ignition; turn over.
17. kick up,
a. to drive or force upward by kicking.
b. to stir up (trouble); make or cause (a disturbance, scene, etc.).
c. (esp. of a machine part) to move rapidly upward: The lever kicks up, engaging the gear.
n.
18. the act of kicking; a blow or thrust with the foot, feet, leg, or legs.
19. power or disposition to kick: a horse with a mean kick.
20. an objection or complaint.
21.
a. thrill; pleasurable excitement.
b. a strong but temporary interest, often an activity: Photography is her latest kick.
22.
a. a stimulating or intoxicating quality in alcoholic drink or certain drugs.
b. vim, vigor, or energy.
23. Football.
a. an instance of kicking the ball.
b. any method of kicking the ball: a place kick.
c. a kicked ball.
d. the distance such a ball travels.
24. a recoil, as of a gun.
Idioms:
1. kick ass, Vulgar Slang.
a. to act harshly or use force to gain a desired result.
b. to beat; defeat.
c. to be extraordinarily vigorous or successful.
d. to be enjoyable or exciting.
2. kick oneself, to reproach oneself: I could kick myself for forgetting her birthday.
[1350–1400; orig. uncertain]

kick

  • coup de savate - A kick with the flat of the foot.
  • Gaelic football - A rough, football-like game mainly played in Ireland with 15 players to each side with the object of punching, dribbling, or kicking the ball into a goal.
  • punt, bunt - Punt, as in "kick," may be from bunt, "push," used in baseball to mean "hit the ball softly."
  • kick, punt - The dent in the bottom of a wine or champagne bottle is the kick or punt.

kick


Past participle: kicked
Gerund: kicking

Imperative
kick
kick
Present
I kick
you kick
he/she/it kicks
we kick
you kick
they kick
Preterite
I kicked
you kicked
he/she/it kicked
we kicked
you kicked
they kicked
Present Continuous
I am kicking
you are kicking
he/she/it is kicking
we are kicking
you are kicking
they are kicking
Present Perfect
I have kicked
you have kicked
he/she/it has kicked
we have kicked
you have kicked
they have kicked
Past Continuous
I was kicking
you were kicking
he/she/it was kicking
we were kicking
you were kicking
they were kicking
Past Perfect
I had kicked
you had kicked
he/she/it had kicked
we had kicked
you had kicked
they had kicked
Future
I will kick
you will kick
he/she/it will kick
we will kick
you will kick
they will kick
Future Perfect
I will have kicked
you will have kicked
he/she/it will have kicked
we will have kicked
you will have kicked
they will have kicked
Future Continuous
I will be kicking
you will be kicking
he/she/it will be kicking
we will be kicking
you will be kicking
they will be kicking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been kicking
you have been kicking
he/she/it has been kicking
we have been kicking
you have been kicking
they have been kicking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been kicking
you will have been kicking
he/she/it will have been kicking
we will have been kicking
you will have been kicking
they will have been kicking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been kicking
you had been kicking
he/she/it had been kicking
we had been kicking
you had been kicking
they had been kicking
Conditional
I would kick
you would kick
he/she/it would kick
we would kick
you would kick
they would kick
Past Conditional
I would have kicked
you would have kicked
he/she/it would have kicked
we would have kicked
you would have kicked
they would have kicked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kick - the act of delivering a blow with the footkick - the act of delivering a blow with the foot; "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent"
goal-kick - (association football) a kick by the defending side after the attacking side sends the ball over the goal-line
goal-kick - (rugby) an attempt to kick a goal
punting, punt - (football) a kick in which the football is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground; "the punt traveled 50 yards"; "punting is an important part of the game"
place kick, place-kicking - (sports) a kick in which the ball is placed on the ground before kicking
dropkick - (football) kicking (as for a field goal) in which the football is dropped and kicked as it touches the ground
blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
2.kick - the swift release of a store of affective forcekick - the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks"
excitement, exhilaration - the feeling of lively and cheerful joy; "he could hardly conceal his excitement when she agreed"
3.kick - the backward jerk of a gun when it is fired
motion, movement - a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something
4.kick - informal terms for objectingkick - informal terms for objecting; "I have a gripe about the service here"
objection - the speech act of objecting
5.kick - the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs); "a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick"
stimulant, stimulus, stimulation, input - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
6.kick - a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenicskick - a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenics; "the kick must be synchronized with the arm movements"; "the swimmer's kicking left a wake behind him"
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
swimming kick - a movement of the legs in swimming
Verb1.kick - drive or propel with the foot
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
dropkick, drop-kick - drop and kick (a ball) as it touches the ground, as for a field goal
place-kick - kick (a ball) from a stationary position, in football
dropkick, drop-kick - make the point after a touchdown with a dropkick
punt - kick the ball
propel, impel - cause to move forward with force; "Steam propels this ship"
2.kick - thrash about or strike out with the feet
strike out - make a motion as with one's fist or foot towards an object or away from one's body
3.kick - strike with the foot; "The boy kicked the dog"; "Kick the door down"
scuff - poke at with the foot or toe
boot - kick; give a boot to
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"
kick up - cause to rise by kicking; "kick up dust"
kick down, kick in - open violently; "kick in the doors"
boot out, drum out, oust, expel, kick out, throw out - remove from a position or office; "The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds"
4.kick - kick a leg up
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
5.kick - spring back, as from a forceful thrust; "The gun kicked back into my shoulder"
bounce, rebound, ricochet, take a hop, resile, spring, recoil, bound, reverberate - spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide"
6.kick - stop consuming; "kick a habit"; "give up alcohol"
foreswear, forgo, waive, relinquish, dispense with, forego - do without or cease to hold or adhere to; "We are dispensing with formalities"; "relinquish the old ideas"
7.kick - make a goal; "He kicked the extra point after touchdown"
football, football game - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
rack up, score, tally, hit - gain points in a game; "The home team scored many times"; "He hit a home run"; "He hit .300 in the past season"
place-kick - score (a goal) by making a place kick
8.kick - express complaints, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness; "My mother complains all day"; "She has a lot to kick about"
hen-peck, nag, peck - bother persistently with trivial complaints; "She nags her husband all day long"
backbite, bitch - say mean things
grizzle, yammer, yawp, whine - complain whiningly
gnarl, grumble, murmur, mutter, croak - make complaining remarks or noises under one's breath; "she grumbles when she feels overworked"
grouch, grumble, scold - show one's unhappiness or critical attitude; "He scolded about anything that he thought was wrong"; "We grumbled about the increased work load"
protest - utter words of protest
repine - express discontent
beef, bellyache, bitch, gripe, grouse, squawk, holler, crab - complain; "What was he hollering about?"
inveigh, rail - complain bitterly
bemoan, bewail, deplore, lament - regret strongly; "I deplore this hostile action"; "we lamented the loss of benefits"
report - complain about; make a charge against; "I reported her to the supervisor"
bleat - talk whiningly

kick

verb
1. boot, strike, knock, punt, put the boot in(to) (slang) The fiery actress kicked him in the shins.
2. (Informal) give up, break, stop, abandon, quit, cease, eschew, leave off, desist from, end She's kicked her drug habit.
noun
1. (Informal) thrill, glow, buzz (slang), tingle, high (slang), sensation I got a kick out of seeing my name in print.
2. (Informal) pungency, force, power, edge, strength, snap (informal), punch, intensity, pep, sparkle, vitality, verve, zest, potency, tang, piquancy The coffee had more of a kick than it seemed on first tasting.
a kick in the teeth setback, defeat, blow, disappointment, hold-up, hitch, misfortune, rebuff, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), bummer (slang) It's a real kick in the teeth to see someone make it ahead of us.
kick against something oppose, resist, complain about, object to, protest against, spurn, rebel against, grumble about, gripe about (informal) North Sea operators kicked against legislation
kick off (Informal) begin, start, open, commence, launch, initiate, get under way, kick-start, get on the road The shows kick off on October 24th.
kick someone around mistreat, wrong, abuse, injure, harm, misuse, maul, molest, manhandle, rough up, ill-treat, brutalize, maltreat, ill-use, handle roughly, knock about or around I'm not going to let anyone kick me around anymore.
kick someone off something dismiss from, ban from, exclude from, bar from, discharge from, exile from, banish from, evict from, oust from, expatriate from, blackball from, throw you out of, send packing from, turf you out (informal), show you the door out of We can't just kick them off the team.
kick someone out (Informal) dismiss, remove, reject, get rid of, discharge, expel, oust, eject, evict, toss out, give the boot (slang), sack (informal), kiss off (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), give (someone) their marching orders, give the push, give the bum's rush (slang), show you the door, throw you out on your ear (informal), give someone his or her P45 (informal) They kicked five foreign journalists out of the country.
kick something around discuss, consider, talk about, review, debate, examine, thrash out, exchange views on, weigh up the pros and cons of, converse about We kicked a few ideas around.

kick

verb
1. Informal. To express negative feelings, especially of dissatisfaction or resentment:
Informal: crab, gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef, bellyache, bitch.
2. Informal. To express opposition, often by argument:
Informal: squawk.
Idioms: set up a squawk, take exception.
3. Slang. To desist from, cease, or discontinue (a habit, for example):
phrasal verb
kick around
Informal. To speak together and exchange ideas and opinions about:
bandy (about), discuss, moot, talk over, thrash out (or over), thresh out (or over), toss around.
Informal: hash (over), knock about (or around).
Slang: rap.
phrasal verb
kick in
1. Informal. To give in common with others:
Slang: come across.
2. Slang. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
kick off
2. Slang. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
kick out
Slang. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
noun
1. Slang. An expression of dissatisfaction or a circumstance regarded as a cause for such expression:
Informal: gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef.
Idiom: bone to pick.
2. Slang. The act of expressing strong or reasoned opposition:
3. Slang. A stimulating or intoxicating effect:
Informal: punch, sting, wallop.
4. Slang. A strong, pleasant feeling of excitement or stimulation:
Informal: wallop.
Slang: bang, boot, high.
5. Slang. A temporary concentration of interest:
Slang: trip.
6. Slang. A clever, unexpected new trick or method:
Informal: kicker, wrinkle.
Slang: angle.
Translations
إرْتِدادرَفْسَه، لَبْطَهرَكْلَةٌسُرور، إنْفِعال فَرِحيَرْتَد
kopnoutkopnutíkop
sparksparketilbageslagrekylspænding
potkaistapotku
udaracudariti
élvezetet találmegrúgrúgrúgásvisszarúg
sparksparkaánægjaslá, gefa höggslag, högg
蹴り蹴る
차기(..을) 차다
atatrankaatšokti atgalgrubiai elgtis su kuoįspirtipradėti futbolo rungtynes
atsistatsitiensiespertpatīkams satraukumsspārdīt
lovi
kopnutiespätný úder
brcabrcnitiudarec
sparksparkakick
เตะการเตะ
tekmelemektekmetekme atmakzevk almaçifte
لات
cú đáđá

kick

[kɪk]
A. N
1. (gen) → patada f, puntapié m (Sport) → puntapié m, tiro m; (by animal) → coz f
what he needs is a good kick up the backsidelo que necesita es una buena patada en el trasero
to give sth/sb a kickdar una patada a algo/algn
I gave him a kick in the pantsle di una patada en el trasero
he got or took a kick on the legle dieron una patada en la pierna
to take a kick at goaltirar a puerta
it was a kick in the teeth for him (fig) → le sentó como una patada (en la barriga)
2. [of firearm] → culatazo m
3. [of drink] → fuerza f
a drink with a kick to ituna bebida que pega fuerte
4. (= thrill)
I get a kick out of seeing her happyme encanta verla feliz
he gets a kick out of teasing herse refocila tomándole el pelo
to do something for kickshacer algo sólo para divertirse or por pura diversión
5. (= craze) he's on a fishing kick nowahora le ha dado por la pesca
B. VT
1. [+ ball etc] → dar una patada or un puntapié a; [+ goal] → marcar; [+ person] → dar una patada a; [animal] → dar una coz a
he kicked the stone awayapartó la piedra de una patada
to kick sb downstairsechar a algn escaleras abajo de una patada
to kick one's legs in the airagitar las piernas
I could have kicked myself¡me hubiera dado de tortas!
to kick sth out of the wayquitar algo de en medio de una patada
she kicked the door shutcerró la puerta de una patada
to kick the bucketestirar la pata
to kick ass or butt (esp US) → joder al personal
to kick a man when he's downdar a moro muerto gran lanzada
see also heel A1
2. (fig) (= give up)
to kick a habitdejar un hábito
I've kicked smokingya no fumo
C. VI
1. [person] → dar patadas or puntapiés; [baby] → patalear; [animal] → dar coces, cocear
to kick atdar patadas a
she dragged the child off kicking and screamingse llevó al niño a rastras
2. (gun) → dar un culetazo, recular
D. CPD kick boxing Nkick boxing m
kick turn N (Ski) → cambio m brusco de marcha
kick about kick around
A. VT + ADV (gen) → dar patadas a; [+ idea] → darle vueltas a
to kick a ball aboutdivertirse dándole puntapiés a un balón de un lado para otro
to kick sb around (fig) → tratar a algn a patadas
he's been kicked about a lotle han maltratado mucho
B. VI + ADV it's kicking about here somewhereanda por aquí en algún sitio
I kicked about in London for two yearsanduve por Londres durante dos años
kick against VI + PREPrebelarse contra
to kick against the pricks (lit) → dar coces contra el aguijón (fig) → tener una actitud rebelde
kick back
A. VI + ADV (gun) → dar culatazo, recular
B. VT + ADV [+ ball] → devolver
kick down VT + ADVderribar or echar abajo a patadas
kick in
A. VT + ADV
1. [+ door] → derribar or echar abajo a patadas; (= break) → romper a patadas
to kick sb's teeth inromper la cara a algn
2. (US) (= contribute) → contribuir, apoquinar (Sp)
B. VI + ADV (US)
1. (= take effect) → surtir efecto
2. (= contribute) → contribuir, apoquinar (Sp)
kick off VI + ADV (Ftbl) → hacer el saque inicial (fig) [meeting etc] → empezar
kick out
A. VI + ADV [person] → dar patadas (at a) [animal] → dar coces (at a) to kick out against
see kick against
B. VT + ADVechar a patadas (fig) (from job, home) → echar, poner de patitas en la calle
kick up VT + ADV to kick up a row or a din (lit) → armar un jaleo
to kick up a fuss or stink about or over stharmar un escándalo por algo

kick

[ˈkɪk]
vt
[+ ball, stone] → donner un coup de pied dans; [+ person] → donner un coup de pied à
He kicked the ball hard → Il a donné un bon coup de pied dans le ballon.
He kicked me → Il m'a donné un coup de pied.
Nobody could kick a ball as hard as Bobby Charlton
BUT Personne n'avait une frappe aussi lourde que Bobby Charlton.
to kick sb when they are down → frapper un homme à terre
to kick o.s.
I could have kicked myself → Je me serais bouffé.
to kick the habit (= give up) → arrêter le tabac
to kick the bucket (= die) → lâcher la rampe
vi
[horse] → ruer
kicking and screaming (= unwillingly) → avec le couteau sous la gorge
n
(by attacker)coup m de pied
to give sb a kick (= strike) → donner un coup de pied à qn
to be a kick in the teeth → rester en travers de la gorge
[footballer] → coup m de pied
[rifle] → recul m
(= thrill) to get a kick out of sth → se régaler de qch
to do sth for kicks → faire qch parce qu'on aime les émotions fortes, faire qch pour les émotions fortes
He does it for kicks → Il le fait parce qu'il aime les émotions fortes., Il le fait pour les émotions fortes.
kick around
vitraîner
to kick around some ideas → tester quelques idées
kick in
(= begin to take effect) → se mettre en marche
kick off
vi
[footballer] → donner le coup d'envoi
The teams kicked off late because of crowd trouble → Le coup d'envoi fut donné tard à cause d'incidents dans la foule.
(= start) → débuter
vt (= start) → donner le coup d'envoi à qch
kick out
vt (= force to leave) → virer
Voters of Bath kicked him out in 1992 → Les électeurs de Bath l'ont viré en 1992.
His mother kicked him out → Sa mère l'a viré
to kick sb out of sth (= expel) [+ club, organization, country] → virer qn de qch
kick up
vt
to kick up a fuss → faire du foin
Customers who kicked up a fuss have received refunds → Les clients qui ont fait du foin ont été remboursés.
to kick up a fuss about sth → faire du foin à propos de qch
to kick up a rumpus → faire du scandale

kick

n
(= act of kicking)Tritt m, → Stoß m, → Kick m (inf); to take a kick at somebody/somethingnach jdm/etw treten; to give something a kickeiner Sache (dat)einen Tritt versetzen; he gave the ball a tremendous kicker trat mit Wucht gegen den Ball; a tremendous kick by Beckenbauerein toller Schuss von Beckenbauer; to get a kick on the legeinen Tritt ans Bein bekommen, gegen das or ans Bein getreten werden; what he needs is a good kick up the backside or in the pants (inf)er braucht mal einen kräftigen Tritt in den Hintern (inf)
(inf: = thrill) she gets a kick out of ites macht ihr einen Riesenspaß (inf); (physically) → sie verspürt einen Kitzel dabei; to do something for kicksetw zum Spaß or Jux (inf)or Fez (inf)tun; just for kicksnur aus Jux und Tollerei (inf); how do you get your kicks?was machen Sie zu ihrem Vergnügen?
no pl (inf: = power to stimulate) → Feuer nt, → Pep m (inf); this drink hasn’t much kick in itdieses Getränk ist ziemlich zahm (inf); he has plenty of kick left in himer hat immer noch viel Pep (inf)
(of gun)Rückstoß m
vi (person)treten; (= struggle)um sich treten; (baby, while sleeping)strampeln; (animal)austreten, ausschlagen; (dancer)das Bein hochwerfen; (gun)zurückstoßen or -schlagen, Rückstoß haben; (inf: engine) → stottern (inf); kicking and screaming (fig)unter großem Protest; he kicked into third (inf)er ging in den dritten (Gang)
vt
(person, horse) sbtreten, einen Tritt versetzen (+dat); doortreten gegen; footballkicken (inf); objecteinen Tritt versetzen (+dat), → mit dem Fuß stoßen; to kick somebody’s backsidejdn in den Hintern treten; to kick somebody in the head/stomachjdm gegen den Kopf/in den Bauch treten; to kick somebody in the teeth (fig)jdn vor den Kopf stoßen (inf); to kick a goalein Tor schießen; to kick one’s legs in the airdie Beine in die Luft werfen; to kick the bucket (inf)abkratzen (inf), → ins Gras beißen (inf); I could have kicked myself (inf)ich hätte mich ohrfeigen können, ich hätte mir in den Hintern beißen können (inf)
(inf: = stop) to kick heroinvom Heroin runterkommen (inf); to kick the habites sich (dat)abgewöhnen

kick

:
kick-ass
adj attr (US inf) → Wahnsinns- (inf), → Super- (inf), → arschgeil (sl)
kickback
n (inf) (= reaction)Auswirkung f; (as bribe) → Provision f; (= perk)Nebeneinnahme f
kickboxing
nKickboxen nt
kickdown
nKick-down m

kick

:
kickoff
n
(Sport) → Anpfiff m, → Anstoß m; the kick-off is at 3 o’clockAnpfiff ist um 3 Uhr
(inf: of ceremony etc) → Start m, → Anfang m; the kick-off is at 3 o’clockum 3 gehts los (inf); for a kick-off (= to begin with)erst mal, zunächst
kickout
n
(Ftbl) → Abschlag m
(fig inf: = dismissal) → Rausschmiss m
kick-start(er)
nKickstarter m
kickturn
n (Ski) → Kehre f

kick

[kɪk]
1. vt (person) → dare or tirare calci a; (ball) → calciare; (subj, horse) → tirare un calcio a
to kick sb downstairs → scaraventare qn giù per le scale
to kick sth out of the way → spostare qc con un calcio
I could have kicked myself (fig) (fam) → mi sarei preso a schiaffi
to kick the bucket (fig) (fam) → tirare le cuoia
to kick a habit (fig) (fam) → liberarsi da un vizio
2. vi (person) → dare calci, tirare calci; (baby, horse) → scalciare
to kick at sth → dare or tirare un calcio a qc
3. n
a. (action) → calcio; (of firearm) → contraccolpo, rinculo
to take a kick at sth/sb → tirare un calcio a qc/qn
to give sth/sb a kick → dare un calcio a qc/qn
this cocktail's got a kick to it (fam) → è forte questo cocktail
it was a kick in the teeth for him (fig) (fam) → per lui è stato uno schiaffo morale
he needs a kick in the pants (fig) (fam) → ha bisogno di un bel calcio nel sedere
b. (fam) (thrill) he gets a kick out of itci prova un gusto matto
to do something for kicks → fare qc per divertimento
kick about kick around
1. vt + adv to kick a ball about or aroundgiocare a pallone
2. vi + adv (fam) (object) → essere in giro
kick against vi + preplottare contro
kick back
1. vi + adv (gun) → rinculare
2. vt + adv (ball) → rinviare, rimandare
kick down vt + advabbattere a calci
kick in vt + advabbattere, sfasciare
to kick sb's teeth in (fam) → spaccare la faccia a qn
kick off vi + adv (Ftbl) → dare il calcio d'inizio (fig) (fam) (meeting) → cominciare
kick out
1. vi + adv to kick out (at)tirare calci (a)
2. vt + adv (fig) (fam) to kick sb out (of)cacciare qn via (da), buttare qn fuori (da)
kick up vt + adv (fig) (fam) to kick up a row or a dinscatenare un putiferio
to kick up a fuss about or over sth → piantare un casino per qc

kick

(kik) verb
1. to hit or strike out with the foot. The child kicked his brother; He kicked the ball into the next garden; He kicked at the locked door; He kicked open the gate.
2. (of a gun) to jerk or spring back violently when fired.
noun
1. a blow with the foot. The boy gave him a kick on the ankle; He was injured by a kick from a horse.
2. the springing back of a gun after it has been fired.
3. a pleasant thrill. She gets a kick out of making people happy.
kick about/around
to treat badly or bully. The bigger boys are always kicking him around.
kick off to start a football game by kicking the ball: We kick off at 2.30 . ( noun ˈkick-off: The kick-off is at 2.30)
kick up
to cause or start off (a fuss etc).

kick

رَكْلَةٌ, يَرْكُلُ kopnout, kopnutí spark, sparke treten, Tritt κλοτσιά, κλοτσώ dar patadas, patada potkaista, potku coup de pied, donner un coup de pied udarac, udariti calcio, dare un calcio 蹴り, 蹴る 차기, (..을) 차다 schop, schoppen spark, sparke kopnąć, kopnięcie chutar, chute, dar um pontapé, pontapé пинать, пинок spark, sparka เตะ, การเตะ tekme, tekmelemek cú đá, đá

kick

n. patada, puntapié
v. patear, dar puntapiés; [addiction]
to ___ the habit [to abstain or stay away]dejar la droga.

kick

n patada; vt, vi patear, dar una patada, dar patadas; (fam, a habit) dejar (un vicio); Can you feel your baby kicking?..¿Siente las patadas de su bebé?; to — the bucket (fam) morir