milkweed

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milk·weed

 (mĭlk′wēd′)
n.
Any of various plants of the genus Asclepias, having milky juice, usually opposite leaves, variously colored flowers grouped in umbels, and pods that split open to release seeds with downy tufts.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

milkweed

(ˈmɪlkˌwiːd)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: silkweed any plant of the mostly North American genus Asclepias, having milky sap and pointed pods that split open to release tufted seeds: family Asclepiadaceae. See also asclepias
2. (Plants) any of various other plants having milky sap
3. (Plants) orange milkweed another name for butterfly weed
4. (Animals) another name for monarch3
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

milk•weed

(ˈmɪlkˌwid)

n.
1. any of several plants of the genus Asclepias, characterized by a milky juice, clusters of white-to-purple flowers, and pods filled with silky tufted seeds.
2. any of various other plants having a milky juice, as certain spurges.
[1590–1600]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.milkweed - any of numerous plants of the genus Asclepias having milky juice and pods that split open releasing seeds with downy tuftsmilkweed - any of numerous plants of the genus Asclepias having milky juice and pods that split open releasing seeds with downy tufts
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Asclepias, genus Asclepias - genus of chiefly North American perennial herbs: silkweed; milkweed
Asclepias albicans, white milkweed - tall herb with leafless white waxy stems and whitish starlike flowers; southwestern United States
Asclepias curassavica, blood flower, swallowwort - tropical herb having orange-red flowers followed by pods suggesting a swallow with outspread wings; a weed throughout the tropics
Asclepias exaltata, poke milkweed - milkweed of the eastern United States with leaves resembling those of pokeweed
Asclepias incarnata, swamp milkweed - densely branching perennial of the eastern United States with white to crimson or purple flowers
Asclepia meadii, Asclepias meadii, Mead's milkweed - milkweed of central North America; a threatened species
Asclepias purpurascens, purple silkweed - perennial of eastern North America having pink-purple flowers
Asclepias speciosa, showy milkweed - milkweed of southern North America having large starry purple and pink flowers
Asclepias subverticillata, horsetail milkweed, poison milkweed - milkweed of southwestern United States and Mexico; poisonous to livestock
Asclepias tuberosa, butterfly weed, chigger flower, chiggerflower, Indian paintbrush, orange milkweed, pleurisy root, tuber root - erect perennial of eastern and southern United States having showy orange flowers
Asclepias verticillata, whorled milkweed - milkweed of the eastern United States with narrow leaves in whorls and greenish-white flowers
2.milkweed - annual Eurasian sow thistle with soft spiny leaves and rayed yellow flower headsmilkweed - annual Eurasian sow thistle with soft spiny leaves and rayed yellow flower heads
milk thistle, sow thistle - any of several Old World coarse prickly-leaved shrubs and subshrubs having milky juice and yellow flowers; widely naturalized; often noxious weeds in cultivated soil
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

milkweed

[ˈmɪlkwiːd] Nalgodoncillo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
First, several specialized defoliating insect herbivores feed on A. syriaca (Dussourd and Eisner, 1987; Delaney and Higley, 2006).
For example, Morse and Fritz (1983) and Morse (1994) suggested that the scarcity of pollinia limited the production of mature pods in the largely self incompatible A. syriaca. A similar argument was made by Wyatt (1980) in the case of A.
Pleasants (1991), however, showed that 71% of the pollinia recovered following dispersal by honeybees were inserted into stigmatic chambers on other flowers within 1 m of the radioactively labeled pollen source of A. syriaca. Similarly, Shore (1993) estimated the rate of intraramet self-pollination in natural populations of A.