abalone

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ab·a·lo·ne

 (ăb′ə-lō′nē, ăb′ə-lō′-)
n.
Any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell with a row of holes along the outer edge. The colorful pearly interior of the shell is often used for making jewelry or other ornaments. Also called ear shell.

[American Spanish abulón, from Rumsen (Penutian language of the Monterey Bay area) aulon.]

abalone

(ˌæbəˈləʊnɪ)
n
(Animals) any of various edible marine gastropod molluscs of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell that is perforated with a row of respiratory holes. The shells are used for ornament or decoration. Also called: ear shell or haliotis See also ormer
[C19: from American Spanish abulón; origin unknown]

ab•a•lo•ne

(ˌæb əˈloʊ ni)

n.
any gastropod mollusk of the family Haliotidae, having a flat, oval shell: the flesh is used for food and the shell as a source of mother-of-pearl.
[1840–50, Amer.; taken as singular of California Sp abulones, pl. of abulón,aulón]

ab·a·lo·ne

(ăb′ə-lō′nē)
Any of various edible mollusks that have a large, ear-shaped shell. The shell has a row of holes along the outer edge, and the interior is lined with mother-of-pearl.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abalone - any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis having an ear-shaped shell with pearly interiorabalone - any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis having an ear-shaped shell with pearly interior
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
genus Haliotis, Haliotis - type genus of the family Haliotidae
Haliotis tuberculata, ormer, sea-ear - an abalone found near the Channel Islands
Translations
Abalone
abalonipunamerikorva
zeeoor

abalone

[ˌæbəˈləʊnɪ] Noreja f marina

abalone

[ˌæbəˈləʊni] n (= shellfish) → ormeau m abalone shellabalone shell ncoquille f d'ormeau, oreille f de mer

abalone

nSeeohr nt
References in classic literature ?
"Abalones grow here, all along the coast," Billy assured her; "an' I'll get you all you want.
Then, while Billy wandered in a vain search for abalones, Saxon lay and dabbled in the crystal-clear water of a roak-pool, dipping up handfuls of glistening jewels--ground bits of shell and pebble of flashing rose and blue and green and violet.
Billy had to drag Saxon away from the window of a fascinating shop where were iridescent pearls of abalone, set and unset.
"My father had a set of cuff-buttons made of abalone shell," she said.
There were mussels and abalones and clams and rock-oysters, and great ocean-crabs that were thrown upon the beaches in stormy weather.
When otter harvest rates began declining early in the 20th century, sea otters began recovering (either naturally or through reintroductions) in a number of areas throughout their range, a process leading to conflicts with nearshore, marine shellfish fisheries, particularly for abalones, sea urchins, clams, and crabs, whose populations had expanded although sea otter numbers and distribution contracted (Estes & VanBlaricom 1985).
Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest): black, green, and red abalones. U.S.
Abalones. The Resources Agency of California Department of Fish and Game Fish Bulletin 30:58-72.
Withering syndrome susceptibility of northeastern Pacific abalones: a complex relationship with phylogeny and thermal experience.
The abalones were cultured in Gondol-Bali, and the natural foods used for abalone's feeding were analyzed in Bogor Agricultural Institute.
[20.] Leighton DL (1974) The influence of temperature on larval and juvenile growth in three species Southern California abalones. Fish Bull 72: 1137-1145.
The aim of this research was to analyse the proximate in natural foods Gracilaria lichenoides and Ulva fasciata for abalone Haliotis squamata.