abdicate

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abdicate

renounce or relinquish, such as a right: He will abdicate the throne to marry a commoner.; resign, quit; abandon; repudiate
Not to be confused with:
abrogate – to abolish or annul by formal means; to repeal; put aside; cancel; revoke; rescind; nullify: to abrogate a law
arrogate – to claim presumptuously; to assume without right: arrogate the right to make decisions; to attribute or assign to another; ascribe
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

ab·di·cate

 (ăb′dĭ-kāt′)
v. ab·di·cat·ed, ab·di·cat·ing, ab·di·cates
v.tr.
To relinquish (power or responsibility) formally.
v.intr.
To relinquish formally a high office or responsibility.

[Latin abdicāre, abdicāt-, to disclaim : ab-, away; see ab-1 + dicāre, to proclaim; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′di·ca·ble (-kə-bəl) adj.
ab′di·ca′tion n.
ab′di·ca′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abdicate

(ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt)
vb
to renounce (a throne, power, responsibility, rights, etc), esp formally
[C16: from the past participle of Latin abdicāre to proclaim away, disclaim]
abdicable adj
ˌabdiˈcation n
abdicative adj
ˈabdiˌcator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab•di•cate

(ˈæb dɪˌkeɪt)

v. -cat•ed, -cat•ing. v.t.
1. to give up or renounce (authority, duties, a high office, etc.), esp. in a voluntary, public, or formal manner.
v.i.
2. to renounce or relinquish a throne, office, right, power, claim, or responsibility, esp. in a formal manner.
[1535–45; < Latin abdicātus, past participle of abdicāre to renounce =ab- ab- + dicāre to indicate, consecrate (see dedicate)]
ab′di•ca•ble (-dɪ kə bəl) adj.
ab`di•ca′tion, n.
ab′di•ca`tive (-ˌkeɪ tɪv, -kə-) adj.
ab′di•ca`tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

abdicate

- Implies a giving up of sovereign power or the evasion of responsibility (as a parent).
See also related terms for parent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

abdicate


Past participle: abdicated
Gerund: abdicating

Imperative
abdicate
abdicate
Present
I abdicate
you abdicate
he/she/it abdicates
we abdicate
you abdicate
they abdicate
Preterite
I abdicated
you abdicated
he/she/it abdicated
we abdicated
you abdicated
they abdicated
Present Continuous
I am abdicating
you are abdicating
he/she/it is abdicating
we are abdicating
you are abdicating
they are abdicating
Present Perfect
I have abdicated
you have abdicated
he/she/it has abdicated
we have abdicated
you have abdicated
they have abdicated
Past Continuous
I was abdicating
you were abdicating
he/she/it was abdicating
we were abdicating
you were abdicating
they were abdicating
Past Perfect
I had abdicated
you had abdicated
he/she/it had abdicated
we had abdicated
you had abdicated
they had abdicated
Future
I will abdicate
you will abdicate
he/she/it will abdicate
we will abdicate
you will abdicate
they will abdicate
Future Perfect
I will have abdicated
you will have abdicated
he/she/it will have abdicated
we will have abdicated
you will have abdicated
they will have abdicated
Future Continuous
I will be abdicating
you will be abdicating
he/she/it will be abdicating
we will be abdicating
you will be abdicating
they will be abdicating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been abdicating
you have been abdicating
he/she/it has been abdicating
we have been abdicating
you have been abdicating
they have been abdicating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been abdicating
you will have been abdicating
he/she/it will have been abdicating
we will have been abdicating
you will have been abdicating
they will have been abdicating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been abdicating
you had been abdicating
he/she/it had been abdicating
we had been abdicating
you had been abdicating
they had been abdicating
Conditional
I would abdicate
you would abdicate
he/she/it would abdicate
we would abdicate
you would abdicate
they would abdicate
Past Conditional
I would have abdicated
you would have abdicated
he/she/it would have abdicated
we would have abdicated
you would have abdicated
they would have abdicated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.abdicate - give up, such as power, as of monarchs and emperors, or duties and obligations; "The King abdicated when he married a divorcee"
resign, vacate, renounce, give up - leave (a job, post, or position) voluntarily; "She vacated the position when she got pregnant"; "The chairman resigned when he was found to have misappropriated funds"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abdicate

verb
1. resign, retire, quit, step down (informal) The last French king abdicated in 1848.
2. give up, yield, hand over, surrender, relinquish, renounce, waive, vacate, cede, abjure Edward chose to abdicate the throne, rather than give Mrs Simpson up.
3. renounce, give up, abandon, surrender, relinquish, waive, forgo, abnegate Many parents simply abdicate all responsibility for their children.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

abdicate

verb
To give up a possession, claim, or right:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَتَنَازَل عَن العَرْشيَتَنَازَل عَن المَسْؤُولِيَه، يَتَخَلّى
abdikovatvzdát se
abdicerefrasige sig tronengive fra sigoverlade
abdicirati
afsala sérsegja af sér
atsisakymasatsisakytiatsižadėti
atteikties
abdikovať
abdikeraavvisage upp
bırakmaktahttan çekilmek
từ bỏ

abdicate

[ˈæbdɪkeɪt]
A. VT
1. [+ throne] → abdicar
2. [+ responsibility, right] → renunciar a
B. VIabdicar (in favour of en, en favor de)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abdicate

[ˈæbdɪkeɪt]
vt
[king, queen, monarch] [+ throne] → abdiquer
to abdicate responsibility for sb/sth → démissionner de ses responsabilités vis-à-vis de qn/qch, démissionner vis-à-vis de qn/qch
vi [king, queen, monarch] → abdiquer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abdicate

vtverzichten auf (+acc)
vi (monarch)abdanken, abdizieren (dated geh); (pope)zurücktreten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abdicate

[ˈæbdɪkeɪt]
1. viabdicare
2. vt (throne) → abdicare a; (responsibility) → rinunciare a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

abdicate

(ˈӕbdikeit) verb
1. to leave or give up the position and authority of a king or queen. The king abdicated (the throne) in favour of his son.
2. to leave or give up (responsibility, power etc). He abdicated all responsibility for the work to his elder son.
ˌabdiˈcation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next best experiences for stars were in groups where they were co-leaders or abdicators. All of the stars in these groups reported mostly positive experiences.
In fact, Oliver Wyman research suggests as many as 20 percent of employers sponsoring health benefits are already "benefit abdicators," either jettisoning these benefits or moving towards defined contribution programs that shift purchasing responsibility to employees.
AoShe is tied up, disabled and disfigured woman hardly able to move the wheel chair given to her by the cartel of conspirators and abdicators. She is talking to her resurrected martyr son about the departure of her other living sons, who left her suffering from loneliness and inability,Ao Qasas wrote, Aothe sons tell their stories: Some were deported; others chose forgetfulness and there is that who sold himself to the devil.Ao Qasas also wrote the screenplay, did the scene graphics and technique and co-choreographed the play with Dina Abu Hamdan.