ganglion

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gan·gli·on

 (găng′glē-ən)
n. pl. gan·gli·a (-glē-ə) or gan·gli·ons
1. A group of nerve cells forming a nerve center, especially one located outside the brain or spinal cord.
2. Medicine A benign cystic lesion resembling a tumor, occurring in a tendon sheath or joint capsule.
3. A center of power, activity, or energy.

[From Greek, cystlike tumor, nerve bundle.]

gan′gli·on′ic (-ŏn′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ganglion

(ˈɡæŋɡlɪən)
n, pl -glia (-ɡlɪə) or -glions
1. (Anatomy) an encapsulated collection of nerve-cell bodies, usually located outside the brain and spinal cord
2. any concentration of energy, activity, or strength
3. (Pathology) a cystic tumour on a tendon sheath or joint capsule
[C17: from Late Latin: swelling, from Greek: cystic tumour]
ˈganglial, ˈgangliar adj
ˌgangliˈonic, ˈganglionˌated, ˈgangliˌate, ˈgangliˌated adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gan•gli•on

(ˈgæŋ gli ən)

n., pl. -gli•a (-gli ə)
-gli•ons.
1. a concentrated mass of interconnected nerve cells.
2. a cystic tumor formed on the sheath of a tendon.
3. a center of intellectual or industrial force, activity, etc.
[1675–85; < Late Latin: a type of swelling < Greek gánglion a tumor under the skin, on or near a tendon]
gan′gli•al, gan′gli•ar, adj.
gan`gli•on′ic (-ˈɒn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gan·gli·on

(găng′glē-ən)
Plural ganglia
A compact group of nerve cells having a specific function. In invertebrate animals, pairs of ganglia occur at intervals along the axis of the body, with the forwardmost pair functioning like a brain. In vertebrates, ganglia are usually located outside the brain or spinal cord and control the functioning of the body's internal organs.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ganglion

A mass of nerve cell bodies outside the central nervous system.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ganglion - an encapsulated neural structure consisting of a collection of cell bodies or neuronsganglion - an encapsulated neural structure consisting of a collection of cell bodies or neurons
autonomic ganglion - any of the ganglia of the autonomic system whose unmyelinated fibers innervate the internal organs
nervous system, systema nervosum - the sensory and control apparatus consisting of a network of nerve cells
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
basal ganglion - any of several masses of subcortical grey matter at the base of each cerebral hemisphere that seem to be involved in the regulation of voluntary movement
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
gangliohermokeskushermosolmu

ganglion

[ˈgæŋglɪən] N (ganglia, ganglions (pl)) [ˈgæŋglɪə]ganglio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ganglion

n pl <ganglia>
(Anat) → Ganglion nt; (Med) → Überbein nt, → Ganglion nt
(fig, of activity) → Zentrum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ganglion

[ˈgæŋglɪən] nganglio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

gan·gli·on

n. ganglio.
1. masa de tejido nervioso en forma de nudo;
2. quiste en un tendón o en una aponeurosis, que se observa a veces en la muñeca, en el talón o en la rodilla;
___ -a, basal___ -s basales;
___, carotid___ carotídeo;
___, celiac___ celíaco.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ganglion

n (pl -glia) (neuro) ganglio; — cyst ganglión m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Decades before molecular techniques advanced the search for opsins, photosensitivity in the sixth abdominal ganglion (also called the caudal photoreceptor) had been detected in several decapod crustaceans (an order that includes lobsters and crayfishes), which could evoke a tail flexion escape response (Wilkens and Larimer, 1976; Edwards, 1984).
The thoracic ganglion is a part of the thoracic ganglion mass, which also includes the subesophageal ganglion and abdominal ganglion. In the thoracic ganglion, PR immunoreactivity was detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm of nerve cells.
The hindgut and abdominal nerve cord with the intact seventh nerve (N7) of the sixth abdominal ganglion (A6) were removed from the crayfish, then incubated in 1 [micro]mol [l.sup.-1] 5-HT for 60 min and washed in crayfish saline for 10 min.
Distribution of glutamatergic immunoreactive neurons in the terminal abdominal ganglion of the crayfish.
The FPI cluster in crayfish contains four motor neurons in the four most anterior abdominal ganglia, but only three in the fifth abdominal ganglion (Mittenthal and Wine, 1978).
The first direct demonstration of synapse-specific facilitation in Aplysia examined the connections of individual siphon SNs onto two physically separate sets of postsynaptic targets: at proximal SN synapses onto nearby central motor neurons (CMNs) in the intact abdominal ganglion, and at SN synapses onto peripheral motor neurons (PMNs) at the distal end of the attached siphon nerve, several centimeters away (Clark and Kandel, 1993; Gooch and Clark, 1997).
Using a reduced preparation, Youssef Ezzeddine and I (Ezzeddine and Glanzman, 2003) tested whether persistent habituation of the gill-withdrawal reflex depends on activation of glutamate receptors within the abdominal ganglion. (Ezzeddine and I originally termed this form of habituation long-lasting habituation, or LLH.
For example, photosensitive neurons have been found in the 6th abdominal ganglion of crayfish (Prosser, 1934; Kennedy, 1958, 1963; Bruno and Kennedy, 1962), in the abdominal ganglion and the brain of insects (Arikawa et al., 1991; Ichikawa, 1991; Hariyama, 2000), in the brain of spiders (Yamashita and Tateda, 1981, 1983), and in the telson (Zwicky, 1968) and the metasomata of scorpions (Geethabali and Rao, 1973).