abdominal

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ab·dom·i·nal

 (ăb-dŏm′ə-nəl)
adj.
Of or relating to the abdomen.
n.
An abdominal muscle: an exercise machine that works the abdominals.

ab·dom′i·nal·ly adv.

ab•dom•i•nal

(æbˈdɒm ə nl)

adj.
1. of, in, on, or for the abdomen.
n.
2. Usu., abdominals. the abdominal muscles.
[1740–50; < Latin abdōmin-, s. of abdōmen abdomen + -al1]
ab•dom′i•nal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abdominal - the muscles of the abdomenabdominal - the muscles of the abdomen    
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
abdomen, belly, stomach, venter - the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis
abdominal external oblique muscle, external oblique muscle, musculus obliquus externus abdominis, oblique - a diagonally arranged abdominal muscle on either side of the torso
musculus transversalis abdominis, transverse muscle of abdomen, transversus abdominis, transversus abdominis muscle - a flat muscle with transverse fibers that forms the anterior and lateral walls of the abdominal cavity
Adj.1.abdominal - of or relating to or near the abdomenabdominal - of or relating to or near the abdomen; "abdominal muscles"

abdominal

adjective gastric, intestinal, visceral vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain
Translations
بَطْنِي، مُتَعَلِّق بِالْبَطن
břišní
bughule-mave-
hasi
kviîar-, kviîarhols-
abdominalbuk-mage-
brušný
karna ait

abdominal

[æbˈdɒmɪnl]
A. ADJabdominal
B. N abdominals (= muscles) → abdominales mpl

abdominal

[æbˈdɒmɪnəl]
adj [pain, cramps] → abdominal(e); [muscles, wall, surgery] → abdominal(e)
abdominals nplabdominaux mpl

abdominal

adjabdominal (form); (in man, mammals also) → Unterleibs-; (in insects also) → Hinterleibs-; abdominal painUnterleibsschmerzen pl; abdominal segmentsAbdominalsegmente pl; abdominal wallBauchdecke f

abdominal

[æbˈdɒmɪnl] adjaddominale

abdomen

(ˈӕbdəmən) noun
the part of the body between the hips and the lower ribs.
abˈdominal (-ˈdo-) adjective

ab·dom·i·nal

a. abdominal, rel. al abdomen;
___ bandagevendaje ___;
___ breathingrespiración ___;
___ cavitycavidad ___;
___ crampsretortijón, torzón;
___ dyspneadisnea ___;
___ distentiondistensión ___;
___ fistulafístula ___;
___ injuriestraumatismos ___-es;
___ puncturepunción ___;
___ reflexesreflejos ___-es;
___ rigidityrigidez ___;
___ tumortumor ___.

abdominal

adj abdominal
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of which may remain unrecognized in the postoperative course resulting later in an incisional hernia, to the dramatic "burst abdomen" or evisceration which consists of protrusion of the abdominal viscera due to dehiscence of all the planes of the abdominal wall after laparotomy9.
If the tenderness is alleviated, then the pathology is likely to arise from the abdominal viscera as the contracted rectus muscle now protects the intra-abdominal contents.
Notochord is important in the induction of thoracic and abdominal viscera as well as the neural tube.
Though some surgeons use it as intra-abdominal placement for repair of ventral and incisional hernias, this is not advisable since literature reports of complications of bowel adhesions, bowel obstruction, fistulization and erosion into abdominal viscera even after many years.
Other abdominal viscera showed no abnormality [Figure 1].
The patient underwent left side thoracoscopy and a tear in the diaphragm was found with slight bulging of the fundus of the stomach through the tear without herniation of any abdominal viscera to the thoracic cavity apart from a small piece of omentum.
Hence, reduced abdominal wall thickness and superficially located abdominal viscera might form one of the criteria in differential diagnosis of hernia.
The tumor was reportedly extended into the belly, including the stomach, duodenum, liver and pancreas, a matter that necessitated the removal of part of the abdominal viscera, the paper said.
Less common locations include the mesentery, retroperitoneum, abdominal viscera, lung, and mediastinum.
Atherosclerosis or complications of a vascular interventional procedure can place the abdominal viscera at risk.
2 Spontaneous rupture of abdominal viscera due to FXIII deficiency is rare.