abduction

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Related to abductions: Alien abductions

ab·duct

 (ăb-dŭkt′)
tr.v. ab·duct·ed, ab·duct·ing, ab·ducts
1. To carry off by force; kidnap.
2. Physiology To draw away from the midline of the body or from an adjacent part or limb.

[Latin abdūcere, abduct- : ab-, away; see ab-1 + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

ab·duct·ee′ n.
ab·duc′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abduction

(æbˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. the act of taking someone away by force or cunning; kidnapping
2. (Physiology) the action of certain muscles in pulling a leg, arm, etc away from the median axis of the body
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab•duc•tion

(æbˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of abducting.
2. the state of being abducted.
3. the illegal carrying or enticing away of a person, esp. by interfering with a relationship, as the taking of a child from its parents.
[1620–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

abduction

1. Movement of a limb away from the body’s midline, or of a digit away from a limb’s axis. Abductor muscles are muscles that contract to move part of the body outward.
2. A movement outward from the center of the body or of a limb.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abduction - the criminal act of capturing and carrying away by force a family memberabduction - the criminal act of capturing and carrying away by force a family member; if a man's wife is abducted it is a crime against the family relationship and against the wife
seizure, capture - the act of taking of a person by force
2.abduction - (physiology) moving of a body part away from the central axis of the bodyabduction - (physiology) moving of a body part away from the central axis of the body
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abduction

noun kidnapping, seizure, carrying off the abduction of four black youths from a church hostel in Soweto
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
خَطْف
абдукция
únos
bortførelsekidnapning
EntführungAbduktion
elrablás
brottnám, mannrán
abductiekidnappingontvoering
bortføringkidnappingabduksjon
únos
ugrabitev
kaçırma

abduction

[æbˈdʌkʃən] Nrapto m, secuestro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abduction

[æbˈdʌkʃən] n [person, child] → enlèvement m
child abduction → enlèvement m d'enfant
alien abduction → enlèvement m par des extra-terrestres
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abduction

nEntführung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abduction

[æbˈdʌkʃn] nrapimento, sequestro di persona
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

abduct

(əbˈdakt) verb
to take (someone) away against his will usually by trickery or violence; to kidnap. The president has been abducted.
abˈduction (-ʃən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Word had come of the abduction of Thuvia of Ptarth from her father's court, and with it the veiled hint that the Prince of Helium might be suspected of considerable knowledge of the act and the whereabouts of the princess.
But, if I run away with her afterward, and if you are there, aiding and abetting me, we are guilty of Abduction, and we may stand, side by side, at the bar of the Old Bailey to answer for it!"
This could only be determined at the moment and the place themselves; but it was certain that the abduction must be made that night, and not when, at break of day, the victim was led to her funeral pyre.
Now, as D'Artagnan had plenty of time for reflection, he battered his brains during this time in endeavoring to find out how Athos had seen King Charles, how he had conspired his departure with him, and lastly, how he had entered Monk's camp; and the poor lieutenant of musketeers plucked a hair from his mustache every time he reflected that the horseman who accompanied Monk on the night of the famous abduction must have been Athos.
"Have you not said that that abduction was entirely political?"
Clayton told of the abduction of Jane Porter and the need of armed men to aid in the search for her.
Lady Greystoke never rode alone at any great distance from the bungalow, and the savage loyalty of the ferocious Waziri warriors who formed a great part of Tarzan's followers seemed to preclude the possibility of a successful attempt at forcible abduction, or of the bribery of the Waziri themselves.
"I was at the performance and no one in the world but Erik could contrive an abduction like that!...Oh," he said, with a deep sigh, "I recognized the monster's touch!..."
This forcible abduction, so roughly carried out, was accomplished with the rapidity of lightning.
Only, during the respite the absence of his rival afforded him, he reflected, partly on the means of deceiving Mercedes as to the cause of his absence, partly on plans of emigration and abduction, as from time to time he sat sad and motionless on the summit of Cape Pharo, at the spot from whence Marseilles and the Catalans are visible, watching for the apparition of a young and handsome man, who was for him also the messenger of vengeance.
The plan for Natalie Rostova's abduction had been arranged and the preparations made by Dolokhov a few days before, and on the day that Sonya, after listening at Natasha's door, resolved to safeguard her, it was to have been put into execution.
At the same instant he recognized the evil features of the rajah as those of the man who had directed the abduction of Virginia Maxon from the wrecked Ithaca.