abhorrence


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ab·hor·rence

 (ăb-hôr′əns, -hŏr′-)
n.
1. One that is disgusting, loathsome, or repellent.
2. A feeling of repugnance or loathing.

abhorrence

(əbˈhɒrəns) or

abhorrency

n
1. a feeling of extreme loathing or aversion
2. a person or thing that is loathsome

ab•hor•rence

(æbˈhɔr əns, -ˈhɒr-)

n.
1. a feeling of extreme aversion; loathing.
2. something or someone abhorred.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abhorrence - hate coupled with disgustabhorrence - hate coupled with disgust    
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action

abhorrence

noun hatred, hate, horror, disgust, loathing, distaste, animosity, aversion, revulsion, antipathy, enmity, abomination, repugnance, odium, detestation, execration They are anxious to show their abhorrence of racism.

abhorrence

noun
Translations
كَرَاهِيَة، مَقْت
hrůzaošklivost
afsky
iljetysinhokammo
viîbjóîur

abhorrence

[əbˈhɒrəns] N
1. (= feeling) → aborrecimiento m, repugnancia f
violence fills me with abhorrenceaborrezco la violencia
to hold in abhorrenceaborrecer, detestar
2. (= object) → abominación f

abhorrence

[æbˈhɒrəns] n (= hatred) [violence, terrorism, hypocrisy, racism] → aversion f; [person] → aversion f

abhorrence

nAbscheu f (→ of vor +dat)

abhorrence

[əbˈhɒrns] navversione f, orrore m
to have an abhorrence of sth → detestare qc

abhor

(əbˈhoː) past tense, past participle abˈhorred verb
to hate very much. The headmaster abhors violence.
abˈhorrence (-ˈho-) noun
abˈhorrent (-ˈho-) adjective
(with to) hateful. Fighting was abhorrent to him.
References in classic literature ?
In his last letter he actually gave me some particulars of her behaviour at Langford, such as he received from a gentleman who knew her perfectly well, which, if true, must raise abhorrence against her, and which Reginald himself was entirely disposed to credit.
- Their Contempt of Beards- Ornaments- Armor and Weapons.-Mode of Flattening the Head.- Extent of the Custom.- Religious Belief.- The Two Great Spirits of the Air and of the Fire.- Priests or Medicine Men.- The Rival Idols.- Polygamy a Cause of Greatness- Petty Warfare.- Music, Dancing, Gambling.- Thieving a Virtue.- Keen Traders- Intrusive Habits - Abhorrence of Drunkenness- Anecdote of Comcomly.
No true Christian could cherish such bitter feelings as I do against him and her, especially the latter: him, I still feel that I could pardon - freely, gladly - on the slightest token of repentance; but she - words cannot utter my abhorrence. Reason forbids, but passion urges strongly; and I must pray and struggle long ere I subdue it.
It is not, perhaps, entirely because the whale is so excessively unctuous that landsmen seem to regard the eating of him with abhorrence; that appears to result, in some way, from the consideration before mentioned: i.
I began to feel that my abhorrence for Strickland could only be sustained by an effort on my part.
He could not rejoin the army where he would have been made colonel at the next vacancy, for his mother now clung to him as her one hold on life; and so despite his reluctant to remain in Moscow among people who had known him before, and despite his abhorrence of the civil service, he accepted a post in Moscow in that service, doffed the uniform of which he was so fond, and moved with his mother and Sonya to a small house on the Sivtsev Vrazhek.
Not a single female was present but found some means of expressing her abhorrence of poor Jenny, who bore all very patiently, except the malice of one woman, who reflected upon her person, and tossing up her nose, said, "The man must have a good stomach who would give silk gowns for such sort of trumpery!" Jenny replied to this with a bitterness which might have surprized a judicious person, who had observed the tranquillity with which she bore all the affronts to her chastity; but her patience was perhaps tired out, for this is a virtue which is very apt to be fatigued by exercise.
The instant the housekeeper knew who it was, she ran to hide herself so as not to see him; in such abhorrence did she hold him.
SCARCELY six weeks passed before I had lost every feeling but dislike and abhorrence for this infamous experiment of Moreau's.
As her successor in that house, she regarded her with jealous abhorrence. Whenever Charlotte came to see them, she concluded her to be anticipating the hour of possession; and whenever she spoke in a low voice to Mr.
But Winthrop and most of the other leading men, as well as the ministers, felt an abhorrence of her doctrines.
She was readily ransomed for a few articles of trifling value; and forthwith figured about the camp in fine array, "with rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes," and a tossed-up coquettish air that made her the envy, admiration, and abhorrence of all the leathern-dressed, hard-working squaws of her acquaintance.